Lesson 3: How does implementing Marzano's third instructional strategy affect student learning?

Return to Lesson 1: Why is effort important?

StudentProgressGraph.jpg

Return to Lesson 2: How can recognition increase student growth?

Continue to Lesson 4: What were the results of providing student recognition and reinforcing effort?


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Focus Objective

In this lesson, learners will

  • learn strategies to implement in their classroom to increase student effort and achievement
  • understand how effort and feedback affects student growth

Introduction

Marzano's third instructional strategy, Reinforcing Effort and Providing Feedback, has the ability to produce a twenty-nine percent gain in student achievement. Effort and recognition express the attitudes and beliefs of students, and it is the educator’s responsibility to illustrate the connection between effort and achievement. Recognition is proven to be most effective if it is dependent on the achievement of a certain standard. Research also has found that positive recognition is more effective in altering student behavior than tangible rewards. Outlined in the figure below are some examples of what Marzano's third instructional strategy might look like in the classroom.

High Yield Strat.jpg


Reading

The Art and Science of Teaching / When Students Track Their Progress

Robert J. Marzano

The strategy of tracking student progress on specific learning goals is well supported. For example, Fuchs and Fuchs1 found that providing teachers with graphic displays of students' scores on formative assessments was associated with a 26 percentile point gain in achievement. Unfortunately, this strategy has not received the attention it deserves.

When students track their own progress on assessments using graphic displays, the gains are even higher. Over my many years of working with teachers, I have had the opportunity to examine the effects of such an approach. In 14 different studies, teachers had students in one class track their progress on assessments; in a second class, these teachers taught the same content for the same length of time without having students track their progress (seewww.marzanoresearch.com/research/strategy20_trackingprogress.aspx). On average, the practice of having students track their own progress was associated with a 32 percentile point gain in their achievement.

Figure 1. Student Progress Chart

Reading Figure 1.gif

In the studies, students recorded their scores on a chart after taking each assessment. Figure 1 shows how a student tracked her progress on the topic of habitats using her scores on four different assessments. Using a rubric with a rating scale of 0 to 4 to score the assessments, this student began with a score of 1.5 on the first assessment and ended with a score of 3.5 on the fourth assessment.

This approach provides two kinds of information for students and teachers. First, the rubric provides a description of the levels of performance that the teacher expects of the students. Second, the graph provides a representation of each student's progression of learning. The combination of these two types of information produces the powerful effect.

Continue reading The Art and Science of Teaching/ When Students Track Their Progress here: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/dec09/vol67/num04/When-Students-Track-Their-Progress.aspx






Methods for Students to Improve and Track Achievement

Bullet blue.png Provide Student Rubrics and Guidelines

MarzanoStudentRubric.jpg

Click on the attachments for examples:

Student-Friendly Marzano Student Self Assessment Rubric

Student Writing Rubric and Self Assessment Comparing Two Essays

General Rubric for Projects

Student Friendly Checklist for Problem Solving

Poetry Packet Fun





Thumbs.jpg

Bullet blue.png Provide Spreadsheets & Student Self Reflections

Click on the attachments for examples:

Math Tracking Forms for Student Progress and Reflection

Student Self Reflection for Lesson Objectives/Learning Targets

Student Friendly Goal Sheets

Student Progress Graphing Page



Methods to Provide Effective Recognition

Bullet blue.png Provide Effective Recognition

Click on the links/attachments for examples:

Hats Off.jpg

Create Awards

Positive Letters, Notes, and Newsletters

Ideas to celebrate a Star Student or Student of the Week

Words for Praise


Activity One

Bullet blue.png Choose to adapt one or two of the above strategies to track achievement to utilize in your classroom.

You could also create a rubric with this helpful and easy to use site: RubiStar http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php

Another great option would be to create a rubric with your students prior to beginning a lesson or unit.

Bullet blue.png Implement the strategies and track student progress to evaluate effectiveness of each strategy.


Activity Two

Bullet blue.png Follow steps for providing effective recognition from Lesson 2.

Bullet blue.png Implement the strategies for providing effective recognition and utilize one or two of the above suggestions for providing recognition in your classroom. Track student progress to evaluate effectiveness of student recognition.


Resources

Clark, A. (2012). Something to HOOT About Note Home. Retrieved from http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Something-to-HOOT-About-Note-Home-314049

Cooper, L. (2013). Outstanding Note Home. Retrieved from http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Outstanding-Note-Home-151394

Feriazzo, L. (2012, January 10) Response: Ways to Include Students in the Formative Assessment Process. Retrieved from http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/classroom_qa_with_larry_ferlazzo/2012/01/matt_townsley_asked_carol_boston.html

LA Beach Teacher. (2012, May) Poetry Packet Fun. Retrieved from http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Poetry-Packet-Fun-240825

Lepi, K. (2014, April 3) 7 Things to Remember About Classroom Feedback. Retrieved from http://www.edudemic.com/feedback-infographic/

Marzano, R. (2009) The Art and Science of Teaching/ When Students Track Their Progress. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/dec09/vol67/num04/When-Students-Track-Their-Progress.aspx

Nannini, K. (2012, July 19) Young Teacher Love: Math and ELA Student Data Tracking Binders and a Freebie!! Retrieved from http://youngteacherlove.blogspot.com/2012/07/math-data-binders-and-freebie.html

Orman, T. (2010). Mrs. Orman's Classroom [Blog Post]. Retrieved from http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Tracee-Orman

Pearson, S. (2014) Teacher's Take-Out [Blog Post]. Retrieved from http://teacherstakeout.blogspot.com

Links

Return to Lesson 1: Why is effort important?

Return to Lesson 2: How can recognition increase student growth?

Continue to Lesson 4: What were the results of providing student recognition and reinforcing effort?


Proceed to Post Evaluation


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