Katherine Watson's Portfolio Page

From KNILT

Design Project Proposal

Development of a mini-course on including multimedia in online courses for higher-ed, to focus on the pedagogical/androgogical implications of using various multimedia. The course will also address some technical considerations and offer instructions and resources.

Some research that I have found touches on how instructor videos help distance learners engage or connect better with the instructor. Additional areas that I could focus on might be learner created media and interactive media.

Course home page: Multimedia in Online Courses

Needs Assessment

Step 1: Describe your intent: the Ideal

With widespread advances in technology in terms of ease-of-use and accessibility, the media choices available to online course developers are vast. Knowing if, when and how to include a media object is not always a clear-cut decision. Choices of which types of media are suitable for a given context and student population can be confusing.
The intent of this course is for anyone involved in the process of course development, including course developers, faculty, instructional designers and technologists (course developers), to gain a better understanding of when and how to incorporate multimedia in online courses for higher education. Individuals utilizing multimedia for education in online courses should have an understanding of the pedagogical implications of using various media, and the impacts on learning styles and cognitive load of the students.
Some things that course developers should know are that video can be used to connect with and motivate students, but video and animation may not always be the best way to illustrate complicated processes. Some ways that multimedia can be better utilized to illustrate complicated processes is by giving the users more control over the media through a user interface for navigation.

Step 2: Gather Information: Reality

Based on personal, professional experience of the author, there is clearly a need for a better understanding among course developers (to include: course developers, faculty, instructional designers and technologists) of when and how to incorporate multimedia into online courses in higher-ed. Since 2000, the author has been working closely with course developers to develop multimedia learning objects to include in online courses in various subject areas. The population is inconsistent in their understanding of the reasons for including multimedia in their courses and the best practices for utilizing multimedia.
Learner Profile: The individuals in need of this understanding regarding the use of multimedia are anyone developing courses for higher education at the college. This would include course developers, faculty, instructional designers and technologists who support these projects. The technological expertise of the population will vary, but the focus of this course will be on pedagogical/andragocical reasons and implications for using multimedia. The individuals are professionals for whom course development is a part of their professional obligation. They are also motivated by the desire to best serve the students.
Setting for instruction: Instruction, content delivery and community development take place in the college's learning management system (ANGEL).

Step 3: Summarize & revise your intent: Goals

The goal of this course is to improve the overall understanding and practice of utilizing multimedia in online courses by all course developers at the college. The outcome of this course will be increased use of multimedia which is appropriate to the content, learning objectives and students.

("Steps to Conduct a Needs Assessment," Shambaugh and Magliaro, 1997, p. 65)

Performance Objectives

//Given the ANGEL learning environment and the many media options available to deliver content online, the participant chooses multimedia that promotes student perceived connection with the instructor, as evidenced in their course development proposals.

//Given the many multimedia options to deliver content online, the participant classifies multimedia that target varied student learning styles, as evidenced in peer discussions.

//Given the ANGEL learning environment and the many media options to deliver content online, the participant adopts a balanced use of multimedia with consideration of cognitive load impacts on students, as evidenced in their course development proposals (i.e lesson plans).

The first three will be addressed in the units.

Given the ANGEL learning environment and the many media options to deliver content online, the participant generates a course development proposal which utilizes multimedia as a tool for project-based learning, shown in the course development proposals.

Given the ANGEL learning environment and the many media options to deliver content online, the participant adopts multimedia that engages students with the course content, as evidenced in their course development proposals.

Information Processing Analysis

Rationale for using multimedia to promote teacher-student connection.

  • the importance of teacher-student connection in distance learning in particular
  • types of media that promote students' perceived connection with their instructor
  • incorporating an audio greeting into an ANGEL course
  • incorporating a video greeting into an ANGEL course
  • resources, and/or how to find helpful resources
  • how to submit a multimedia development or training work request

About learning styles, rationale for addressing varied student learning styles in instruction

  • multimedia that targets varied learning styles
  • how to find and insert a YouTube video into an ANGEL page
  • resources, and/or how to find helpful resources
  • how to submit a multimedia development or training work request

Using media to engage students with course content:

  • types of media which are most effective for various content areas
  • how the issue of cognitive load impacts these choices
  • resources, and/or how to find helpful resources
  • how to submit a multimedia development or training work request

Using multimedia as a tool to support constructivist, project-based learning.

  • designing/developing an authentic task
  • how to find and use online web applications for constructivist learning
  • how to incorporate the use of online web applications in an ANGEL course
  • how to use the ANGEL wiki creation tool
  • resources, and ways to find helpful resources
  • how to submit a multimedia development or training work request

Prerequisites

  • Experience in developing and organizing instructional content for online courses (ability to write a lesson plan).
  • Receptiveness to new information.
  • Willingness to engage with other learners.
  • Familiarity with using the ANGEL course management system.
  • Basic computer skills including word processing and online searching.
  • Basic communication skills.

Sequencing

Unit 1: Multimedia Overview

Overview of multimedia use in online learning.

Objectives

Upon completion of this unit learners will:

  • demonstrate understanding of issues and affordances of multimedia use in online learning through discussion and reflection.

Mini Lecture

Viewpoints on multimedia and its impact on cognitive load, review of literature

Learning Task

Reading

Discussion

Summarize key points in the reading. Discuss the merits and limitations of these three examples of multimedia:

Reflection

Reflect on how what you've learned may impact your practice.

Resources

Resources for further exploration

Unit 2

Understanding principles of multimedia design.

Objectives

Upon completion of this unit learners will:

  • demonstrate understanding of multimedia design principles through critique and discussion of multimedia use in online learning and reflection on how to use multimedia in their practice.

Mini Lecture

principles of multimedia design, review of literature.

Learning Task

Reading:

Reference:

Design Principles of Multimedia Learning

Discussion

Summarize key points in the reading. Discuss the merits and limitations of these three examples of multimedia:

Reflection

Reflect on how what you've learned may impact your practice.

Resources

Resources for further exploration

Unit 3

Multimedia tools and techniques.

Objectives

Upon completion of this unit learners will:

  • generate in writing a lesson plan which utilizes multimedia in online learning.
  • demonstrate the capability of incorporating multimedia into online courses through execution of a variety of multimedia inclusion tasks.

Mini Lecture

Multimedia tools and techniques.

Learning Task

Write a lesson plan that utilizes multimedia. Post the plan in the discussion space.

Discussion

Submit and discuss the lesson plans.

Reflection

Reflect on how what you've learned may impact your practice.

Resources

Resources for further exploration

Multimedia Resources

GeoGebra

National Library of Virtual Manipulatives

Learning Methods

This mini-course will involve a great deal of discussion and reflection in an online discussion space. There will be analysis and sharing of resources as well. The course strives to promote a participatory knowledge base by encouraging the sharing of resources, discussion and supportive, constructive critique. Through the discussion and reflection exercises learner thinking will be visible to help advance the learning of all. Participants will have the opportunity to apply their knowledge by implementing an online learning unit that incorporates multimedia.

References

Acha, J. (2009). The Effectiveness of Multimedia Programmes in Children's Vocabulary Learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 40(1), 23-31. Retrieved October 22, 2009, from Education Full Text database.

Atkinson, R., Mayer, R., & Merrill, M. (2005). Fostering Social Agency in Multimedia Learning: Examining the Impact of an Animated Agent's Voice. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 30(1), 117-139.

Badge, J., Dawson, E., Cann, A., & Scott, J. (2008). Assessing the Accessibility of Online Learning. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 45(2), 103-113.

Calderhead, D., & Hills, P.(2009). Helping To Keep History Relevant: Multimedia And Authentic Learning. Journal of Interactive Media in Education, 2009, 1-20.

Chen, H., & Williams, J. (2009). Use of Multi-Modal Media and Tools in an Online Information Literacy Course: College Students' Attitudes and Perceptions. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 35(1), 14-24.

Choi, I., Lee, S., & Jung, J. (2008). Designing Multimedia Case-Based Instruction Accommodating Students' Diverse Learning Styles. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 17(1), 5-25.

Guan, Y. (2009). A Study on the Learning Efficiency of Multimedia-Presented, Computer-Based Science Information. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 12(1), 62-72. Retrieved October 22, 2009, from Education Full Text database.

Kilbane, C. (2008). Preservice Teachers' Application of a Problem-Solving Approach on Multimedia Cases. Action in Teacher Education, 29(4), 15-26. Retrieved October 22, 2009, from Education Full Text database.

Lusk, D., Evans, A., Jeffrey, T., Palmer, K., Wikstrom, C., & Doolittle, P. (2009). Multimedia Learning and Individual Differences: Mediating the Effects of Working Memory Capacity with Segmentation. British Journal of Educational Technology, 40(4), 636-651.

Mandernach, B. (2006). The Evolution of Online Course Development: From Basics to Bells and Back Again. Online Classroom, 7-8.

Mayer, R., Hegarty, M., Mayer, S., & Campbell, J. (2005). When Static Media Promote Active Learning: Annotated Illustrations Versus Narrated Animations in Multimedia Instruction. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 11(4), 256-265.

Moneta, G., & Kekkonen-Moneta, S. (2007). Affective Learning in Online Multimedia and Lecture Versions of an Introductory Computing Course. Educational Psychology, 27(1), 51-74.

Muller, D., Bewes, J., Sharma, M., & Reimann, P. (2008). Saying the Wrong Thing: Improving Learning with Multimedia by Including Misconceptions. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 24(2), 144-155.

Muller, D., Sharma, M., & Reimann, P. (2008). Raising cognitive load with linear multimedia to promote conceptual change. Science Education, 92(2), 278-296.

Neo, M., & Neo, T.-K. (2009). Engaging students in multimedia-mediated Constructivist learning – Students’ perceptions. Educational Technology & Society, 12 (2), 254–266.

Rasch, T., & Schnotz, W. (2009). Interactive and Non-Interactive Pictures in Multimedia Learning Environments: Effects on Learning Outcomes and Learning Efficiency. Learning and Instruction, 19(5), 411-422.

Seo, K., Templeton, R., & Pellegrino, D. (2008). Creating a Ripple Effect: Incorporating Multimedia-Assisted Project-Based Learning in Teacher Education. Theory Into Practice, 47(3), 259-265.

Shambaugh, R. N. & Magliaro, S. G. (1997). Mastering the Possibilities - A process approach to instructional design. Allyn and Bacon. (ISBN: 0205197957)

Torrente, J., Moreno-Ger, P., Martínez-Ortiz, I., & Fernandez-Manjon, B. (2009). Integration and Deployment of Educational Games in e-Learning Environments: The Learning Object Model Meets Educational Gaming. Educational Technology & Society, 12 (4), 359–371.

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ETAP 623 Fall 2009

ETAP 623 Fall 2009 Design Project Agenda