Integrated Co-Teaching

From KNILT

About the Course

Have you ever wondered about co-teaching? Do you wonder if this method of special education services will benefit your students? Are you interested in learning new strategies that can be implemented by a two-teacher classroom?

This course will focus on the background behind integrated co-taught (ICT) classes. During this course, you will learn about the Universal Design for Learning, how to differentiate lessons, the benefits and challenges of co-teaching, and how to create a positive co-taught learning environment.


Many of today's schools utilize the Integrated Co-Teaching (ICT) classroom as a way to support learners with mild/moderate disability classifications. By providing students with two teachers, both general education students and students with disabilities can benefit from targeted small group instruction, social-emotional supports and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Co-teaching allows for more flexibility in instruction through differentiation, use of multiple modalities in assessment and experiential learning. However, many teachers are ill-equipped with knowledge of how to work with a co-teacher and all of the different models of co-teaching that can be utilized to maximize instruction in the classroom.

What Will I Get Out of this Course?

Teachers will be able to...

- evaluate the pros and cons of the ICT model for different populations of students.

- identify the roles of the general education and special education teacher in an ICT classroom.

- role-play the different co-teaching models.

- modify instruction and assessment based off of the Universal Design for Learning.

Let's Get Started

Goals:

- identify 3 pros and 3 cons to the Integrated Co-Taught (ICT) model.

- using a venn diagram, accurately sort 8/10 responsibilities of the general education and special education teacher in the ICT classroom.

- create a lesson plan that explicitly state 3 modifications using the Universal Design for learning.

Course Units

This course includes 5 units of study. Click on a unit to go to its reading and assignments.

Unit 1: What is Integrated Co-Teaching?

  • Participants will identify 4/5 core ideas behind ICT by completing an end-of-unit quiz.

Unit 2: Models of Co-Teaching

  • Participants will compare and contrast models of co-teaching by utilizing a Venn Diagram
  • Participants will correctly sort the roles and responsibilities of the general education and special education teachers using a T-chart with 80% accuracy.

Unit 3: Co-Teaching Strategies for Positive Relationships

  • Participants will summarize the tenants of positive co-teaching relationships with a 250-word paragraph.
  • Participants will create a list of 10 questions to ask a co-teacher at the beginning of the year to ensure effective communication and collaboration.

Unit 4: Universal Design for Learning

  • Participants will identify 3 real-world examples of modifications for people with disabilities (ex: a ramp for wheelchair access).
  • Participants will describe the difference between modifications and accommodations with 4 supporting examples.

Unit 5: Modifying Lessons for Students with Disabilities

  • Participants will create or modify an existing unit plan to include modifications and accommodations using the principles of the Universal Design for Learning.

Before you begin, make sure you...

  • are able to navigate an online wiki-course.
  • have access to email to communicate with teacher about assignments.
  • have ability to utilize a word processing program such as Microsoft Word or Google Docs.
  • are a certified teacher with a minimum of Bachelor's Degree in education (at any age level).
  • be familiar with creating/have access to a unit plan in any subject area or age level.

References and Resources

Unit 1:

Friend, M. (2007). The Coteaching Partnership. Educational Leadership, 64(5), 48–52. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com.libproxy.albany.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rch&AN=23996913&site=eds-live&scope=site

Genovese, P. (2014, February 11). Retrieved April 30, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qq5vMsA2_Kw

Pellegrino, A. apelleg2@gmu. ed., Weiss, M., & Regan, K. (2015). Learning to Collaborate: General and Special Educators in Teacher Education. Teacher Educator, 50(3), 187–202. https://doi.org/10.1080/08878730.2015.1038494

United Federation of Teachers. (2019). Integrated Co-Teaching (ICT). Retrieved from http://www.uft.org/teaching/integrated-co-teaching-ict

Unit 2:

Friend, M. P. (2014). Co-teach!: Building and sustaining effective classroom partnerships in inclusive schools. Greensboro, NC: Marily Friend.

Haller, L. S. (2016). Special Educator's Role Within the Co-Taught Classroom. Education and Human Development.

Hanover Research. (2012). The Efffectiveness of the Co-Teaching Model. Hanover Research, 6-8.

Inclusive Classrooms. (n.d.). 6 Co-Teaching Structures. Retrieved from http://inclusiveclassrooms.org/inquiries/6-co-teaching-structures

Unit 3:

Friend, M. P. (2014). Co-teach!: Building and sustaining effective classroom partnerships in inclusive schools. Greensboro, NC: Marily Friend.

Unit 4:

Ralabate, P. (2017, December 11). Universal Design for Learning: Meeting the Needs of All Students. Retrieved from http://www.readingrockets.org/article/universal-design-learning-meeting-needs-all-students

SOOC. (2015, February 02). Retrieved April 30, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=500dhPNZfHg

Teaching In Education. (2016, August 27). Retrieved April 30, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6rT2_fn4u0

Unit 5:

National Center on Universal Design for Learning. (2010, March 17). Retrieved April 30, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KuTJJQWnMaQ&list=PLLKd3h8UX_F_f0XT9ze59-yl6gOv_obIj&index=2

National Center on Universal Design for Learning. (2010, March 17). Retrieved April 30, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTxFYf50l-4&list=PLLKd3h8UX_F_f0XT9ze59-yl6gOv_obIj