Unit 2 - Narrative Strategy

Narrative Comic.png

OBJECTIVES:

  • Participants will demonstrate the construction of a DR-TA (Directed Reading-Thinking Activity) chart for the narrative reading strategy by creating one using Microsoft Word
  • Participants will generate predictions and follow-up answers by reviewing the book and typing them into the DR-TA chart


HOW TO IMPLEMENT A DR-TA (DIRECTED READING-THINKING ACTIVITY):

Directed Reading-Thinking Activities allow students to begin thinking about the text before they actually begin reading. Since this strategy is set up as a sort of guessing game, students are motivated to read and become engaged with the text in order to determine if their hypotheses are correct. Through a Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DR-TA), students use three basic steps to figure out a portion of text. These including predicting, reading, and proving. Students study the title, cover, and the first few illustrations, in a book, and try to predict what is happening without reading any text. Students usually do this activity with partners or in small groups, and it can involve simply a discussion or a chart of their predictions can be completed. When the children are finished predicting one segment of the story, they read the segment that has been discussed in order to prove or disprove their predictions. Usually, DR-TAs are used for narrative texts, but there are more complicated charts that can be used with expository readings. As students predict the plot of one part of the story, it often helps them figure out the next part of the reading (Richardson, Morgan, Fleener, 2006, pp. 197-199). I have added a vocabulary component to the DR-TA chart so students can keep track of the words that need defining. Click here to view a DR-TA that was created for a third grade class that was reading a chapter from Ramona Quimby, Age 8 called, "Rainy Sunday". Media:DR-TA Ramona.pdf


NOW IT IS TIME FOR YOU AND YOUR PARTNER TO WORK ON CREATING YOUR OWN DR-TA.

Follow these steps in order. Do not skip around.

  • 1. On Microsoft Word, create a DR-TA chart similar to the Ramona one.
  • 2. Make sure to include columns for predictions, what really happened, and vocabulary.
  • 3. The following represent the pages for each block: Block 1 - Title/Cover, pp. 2-5; Block 2 - pp. 6-11; Block 3 - pp. 12-17; Block 4 - pp. 18-23; Block 5 - pp. 24-29, Block 6 - pp. 30-31
  • 4. Click the link for the storybook entitled, Snakes and the Boy Who Was Afraid of Them. Snakes and the Boy Who Was Afraid of Them
  • 5. Study the cover, title, and the illustrations on pages 2-11. DO NOT read the text.
  • 6. Write your predictions for the pictures on these pages. After you have made your predictions, read pp. 2-11 and record what really happened. Select vocabulary that you think would be difficult for young children.
  • 7. When you finish pp. 2-11, click on the VoiceThread link in order to compare your answers with those of the teacher and in order to hear suggestions from the teacher. VoiceThread DR-TA
    • PLEASE RIGHT CLICK ON THE LINK AND OPEN IT IN A NEW WINDOW
  • 8. After the VoiceThread, continue completing your DR-TA by doing one set of pages at a time. Follow step #6 for the remainder of the book.
  • 9. Click on this link to check your answers against those of the teacher. Media:Final DR-TA.pdf


REFLECTION:

Discuss, with your partner, how the DR-TA (Directed Reading-Thinking Activity) could help readers in your classrooms. Also, discuss if this would be easy to implement in any elementary classroom. Post your comments of approximately 200 words in the discussion area.


To go on to the next unit click here: Unit 3 - Expository Strategy

Click here to return to the beginning of the course: Promoting Reading Comprehension in the Early Grades