Unit 1 - Pre-Reading Strategy

Prereading strategy.png

OBJECTIVES:

  • Participants will demonstrate the construction of a narrative Prep (Pre-Reading Plan) strategy diagram by creating one using Microsoft Word
  • Participants will generate prior knowledge words by typing the words into the Prep strategy diagram


HOW TO IMPLEMENT A PREP (PRE-READING PLAN) STRATEGY:

The PreP strategy is a motivating way to introduce a new book or reading passage to students. It allows students to share everything they know about or can associate with the reading. Sharing and discussing ideas related to the text, beforehand, peaks students' curiosity and stimulates a desire to investigate the book or passage. PreP strategy is a sort of “factstorming” that is used to activate prior knowledge. This strategy can be used for both narrative and expository texts. Students review the title, illustrations, headings, and index of a book or reading passage to trigger schema and associations. There are three phases to the strategy including: 1) initial associations with the concept to be read about, 2) words to explain why the students made the initial responses, and 3) any new ideas that come to mind while working on the first two phases. For example, if students are studying the topic/book about CROCODILES, they would “factstorm” words to represent their initial associations, such as alligator, swamps, and mean. Next, the students would write words to explain their initial associations, such as Florida, Dundee, and Captain Hook. Lastly, the students would jot down other words that come to mind after working on the first two phases and after reviewing the book or reading selection’s title and illustrations such as, tail, vicious, green, meat, claws, long, and teeth. After the “facstorming” session, the students and/or teacher can create categories to categorize the words that they have generated. For the concept of crocodiles, the categories might include, characteristics, habitat/environment, and associations (Richardson, Morgan, Fleener, 2006, pp. 156-157). However, I believe that it is better for the teacher to create several categories beforehand so younger students know exactly what types of words to look for. Click on the following link to see a sample PreP diagram for the CROCODILE topic: Media:Crocodile PreP.pdf


NOW IT IS TIME FOR YOU AND YOUR PARTNER TO WORK ON CREATING YOUR OWN PREP STRATEGY.

Follow these steps in order. Do not skip around.

  • 1. On Microsoft Word, create a PreP strategy diagram similar to the crocodile one.
  • 2. Place the title of the book, The Snake Who Was Afraid of People, in the large center circle and create text boxes for the words around the title.
  • 3. The following represent the categories that will help you determine and activate prior knowledge words: Characteristics, Associations, & Characters’ Actions
  • 4. Click the link for the storybook entitled, The Snake Who Was Afraid of People. The Snake Who Was Afraid of People
  • 5. Study the cover, title, and the illustrations on pages 2-11. DO NOT read the text.
  • 6. Write words that correspond with the three categories in step #3.
  • 7. When you finish steps 1-6, click on the VoiceThread link in order to compare your answers with those of the teacher and in order to hear suggestions from the teacher. VoiceThread for PreP Strategy
    • PLEASE RIGHT CLICK ON THE LINK AND OPEN IT IN A NEW WINDOW
  • 8. Finish studying the rest of the storybook, and continue writing words that correspond to the three categories.
  • 9. Click on this link to check your answers against those of the teacher. Media:Final Snake PreP.pdf
  • 10. Read the storybook and find out exactly what the book entails.


REFLECTION:

Discuss, with your partner, how the PreP strategy could help readers in your classrooms. Also, discuss if this would be easy to implement in any elementary classroom. Post your comments of approximately 200 words in the discussion area.


To go on to the next unit click here: Unit 2 - Narrative Strategy

Click here to return to the beginning of the course: Promoting Reading Comprehension in the Early Grades