User:Lrsmith

Return to: ETAP 623 Spring 2019 | Promoting Student Autonomy in the Classroom

About me

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My name is Laura Smith. This class is one of the two classes I am currently taking in the CDIT program this semester. Back in 2008, I graduated from Florida Atlantic University with a in B.A. Elementary Education. I am currently a Multilingual Learners/English Language Learners Coordinator and Teacher at a charter school in NYC. I have previously taught First Grade, 7th Grade Civics, 8th Grade U.S. History, and 6th Grade English Language Arts.

My Topic/Purpose

This design project will focus on guiding participants in creating assignments centered on having students work in an autonomous setting.

  • Participants will be able to understand the benefits of promoting student autonomy in the classroom.
  • Participants of this PD participants will be able to plan and implement a unit focusing on promoting student autonomy in the classroom.
  • Participants of this PD participants will be able to reflect and adjust their units on self-reflection and students feedback.

Needs Assessment

Identify Stakeholders and Expectations— Teachers: An easy to follow instructions with supporting resources that are easy to understand and use. Administrators: Resources and outcomes are connected to standards and meet the school's mission statement. Students: Have the freedom to use their interests in learning experiences.

Identify Project Roles and Responsibilities— Myself: Create follow instructions with supporting resources that are easy to understand and use. Teachers: Support student learning and self reflect and share the reflections with me so I can support them and also improve the process. Students: To gain more motivation, engagement, and ownership with their classwork

Define the Problem(s) and Analyze the Needs— Problems: Students lack motivation, engagement, and ownership with their classwork. Creating classwork that is more centered on students’ interests and enables students to work in an autonomous setting will alleviate the problem.

Gather Data on Needs, Resources, and Constraints— Constraints can vary widely due to numerous factors, such as the number of years teaching, familiarity and comfortability with technology, familiarity and comfortability with giving students more responsibilities over the own learning, and existing curriculum in place.

Analyze Learner Needs and Characteristics— Some learners may need different supports. As I continue to work on this design project I can better create a survey that will enable me to differentiate the PD for learners.

Analyze Contexts— The varying levels of comfortably with using technology. Their experiences with having the classroom being student-centered. Being comfortable with their subjects and grade level standards.

Refine and Translate Needs into Goals— By the end of this PD educators will be able to plan a unit focusing on students interests. By the end of this PD will be able to reflect and adjust their units on self-reflection and students feedback. By the end of this PD will be able to give specific feedback to students.

Performance Objectives

  1. Given a survey, participants will be able to identify their strengths and weaknesses
  2. Given data on the benefits of a student autonomous classroom, participants will be able to summarize the findings.
  3. Given a checklist about their students’ abilities and skills, participants will be able to analyze how much assistance to give to students.
  4. Given a planning guide template, participants will be able to construct a unit promoting student autonomy in the classroom.
  5. Given reflection questions, participants will be able to evaluate their unit.
  6. Given their responses from the reflection questions, participants will be able to revise their unit.

Task Analysis

Unit One Background

  • Participants will be able to identify their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Participants will be able to summarize the data on the benefits of a student autonomous classroom.


Unit Two Planning and Implementation

  • Participants will be able to analyze how much assistance to give to students given a checklist about their students’ abilities and skills.
  • Participants will be able to construct a unit promoting student autonomy in the classroom.


Unit Three Reflection

  • Participants will be able to evaluate their unit.
  • Participants will be able to revise their unit.


Essential Prerequisites

  • Participants must familiar with navigating a Wiki course.
  • Participants must willing to have students work in an autonomous setting.

Supportive Prerequisites

  • Participants should have self-reflection skills.
  • Participants should have summarization skills.
  • Participants should have analytical skills.
  • Participants should have lesson planning skills.
  • Participants must have critical thinking skills.
  • Participants must have metacognitive skills.

Curriculum Map

File:Curriculum Map LRSmith.pdf

References and Resources

Ballén, D. dianaballen@fulbrightmail. or. (2014). The Role of Blogs and Web Resources in Students’ Autonomous Learning Awareness. HOW: A Colombian Journal for Teachers of English, 21(2), 10–30. Retrieved from https://libproxy.albany.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eue&AN=102140848&site=ehost-live

Bolkan, S. san. bolkan@csulb. ed., & Griffin, D. J. . (2018). Catch and hold: instructional interventions and their differential impact on student interest, attention, and autonomous motivation. Communication Education, 67(3), 269–286. https://doi.org/10.1080/03634523.2018.1465193

Eunjyu Yu1. (2013). Empowering At-Risk Students As Autonomous Learners: Toward a Metacognitive Approach. Research & Teaching in Developmental Education, 30(1), 35–45. Retrieved from https://libproxy.albany.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eue&AN=92585563&site=ehost-live

Kusurkar, R. A., Croiset, G., & Ten Cate, T. J. (2011). Twelve tips to stimulate intrinsic motivation in students through autonomy-supportive classroom teaching derived from Self-Determination Theory. Medical Teacher, 33(12), 978–982. https://doi.org/10.3109/0142159X.2011.599896

Marshik, T. tmarshik@uwlax. ed., Ashton, P. pashton@ufl. ed., & Algina, J. algina@ufl. ed. (2017). Teachers’ and students’ needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness as predictors of students’ achievement. Social Psychology of Education, 20(1), 39–67. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11218-016-9360-z

Ng, B. betsy. ng. nie@gmail. co., Woon Chia Liu1, & Wang, C. K. J. (2015). A Preliminary Examination of Teachers’ and Students’ Perspectives on Autonomy- Supportive Instructional Behaviors. Qualitative Research in Education (2014-6418), 4(2), 192–221. https://doi.org/10.4471/qre.2015.1463