Unit 3: Creation

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Topic and Purpose

Now is the time to develop a lesson for a blog and a rubric that goes along with it of your own. You have the terminology down, multiple sites you can choose from, and examples of effective activities and lessons with blogs to inspire your ideas!

Learning Objectives

  • Learners will develop an educational blog of their own
  • Learners will develop an educational rubric for their created blog

Lesson 1: Blog

Learning Objective

  • Learners will develop an educational blog of their own

Review

Review all of the past articles, websites, and videos in each of the past lessons. Some are posted here but feel free to go back to any other sources throughout the course as well:


Do

Create a lesson for a blog as a teacher that could be used in your current class or a future class. Upload a link to your blog lesson to My Blog for the rest of the class to view and see. Your blog does not have to be from EduBlogs, or the from the list of suggested blogs if you found an alternative resource, that is fine.


Expectations:

  • Lesson must incorporate the use of a blog - ex. as a journal, summary after an assignment, a project
  • Include activities we reviewed in this mini-course of either discussion or reflection
  • Include expectations and learning objectives of students involvement with blog
  • Construct your teacher version of a blog with your lesson plan and set it up as if your student could view and access it


Reflect

Peer review a fellow classmates' blog lesson. Give them suggestions on what works well, questions you may have that need clarification, and any suggestions for change. Submit your peer review directly to their comment as another comment. Reflect on the articles we have read throughout the course and how well they incorporated features of blogging such as reflection and discussion.

Lesson 2: Rubric

Learning Objectives

  • Learners will develop an educational rubric for their created blog

Read & View

Rubrics are a tool that identifies needed and required criteria for an assignment, task, or project. Rubrics should set up the learning outcomes so it can easily be determined how grades are given. According to Wolfand Stevens, rubrics are "a scoring tool used to evaluate a performance in a given outcome area based on a list of criteria describing the characteristics of products or performances at varying levels of accomplishment." Please read the rest of the article, The Role of Rubrics in Advancing and Assessing Student Learning, to gain a better understanding of the importance of rubrics.


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Click on this link to view article The Role of Rubrics in Advancing and Assessing Student Learning


Read and view the following materials about rubrics. Some are articles about developing effective rubrics, while some are Power Points, and others are examples.


1. Click on this link to view the Rubric Template

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2. Click on this link to view the Discussion Rubric Example

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3. Click on this link to view the Rubrics PowerPoint

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4. Click on this link to view Multiple Sites

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Do

Now that you have become more familiar with rubrics, your task is to create a rubric that goes along with your blog lesson or assignment. It could have to do with the posts, the commenting, or any other aspect your wish to include in your lesson! What the rubric is specifically for is up to you, just make sure it is clearly stated in the heading.

Upload your rubric as a comment in My EduBlog.


Reflect

To wrap up this mini-course, I would like you to reflect what you have learned and done as a whole. Use the following question prompts to guide your discussion post in the DISCUSSION Forum:

  • What have you learned about the use of technology in the classroom?
  • How has your view of blogging changed since taking this course?
  • What are some benefits of blogging for students in the classroom?
  • What are some concerns of blogging for students in the classroom?
  • Do you think you will or will not use the lesson and rubric you developed? Why or why not?
  • What about this course did you like the most?
  • What about this course did you like the least?
  • Would you recommend this course to a friend?

Navigation

Move back to: Unit 2: Use of Blogging

Return to:Introduction to Blogging

References

An Online Journal Devoted To Teaching Excellence. "The Role of Rubrics in Advancing and Assessing Student Learning." The Role of Rubrics in Advancing and Assessing Student Learning 7.1 (n.d.): n. pag. The Journal of Effective Teaching. 2007. Web. 8 Dec. 2014.

"Art Rubric for Verbalization on Art." Art Rubric for Verbalization on Art. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Dec. 2014.

Metaferia, Tekle Ferede. "Using Blogs to Promote Reflective Language Learning." Journal of Language and Culture 3.3 (2012):52-55. Academic Journals. Web. 20 Nov. 2014.

Muncy, James A. "Blogging For Reflection: The Use Of Online Journals To Engage Students In Reflective Learning." Marketing Education Review 24.2 (2014): 101-114. Business Source Premier. Web. 15 Nov. 2014.

Reineke, Martha. "Introduction to Rubrics." CHFA SOA Committee. 2007. PowerPoint Web.

"Rubric Template." Rubric Template. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Dec. 2014.

Stevens, Elizabeth Years, and Rachel Brown. "Lessons Learned From The Holocaust: Blogging To Teach Critical Multicultural Literacy." Journal Of Research On Technology In Education 44.1 (2011): 31-51. ERIC. Web. 7 Dec. 2014.

Template. "Creating Rubrics." UNI.edu (n.d.): n. pag. Web.

"Using Blogs for Peer Feedback and Discussion - Case Study." YouTube. YouTube, 26 Oct. 2010. Web. 08 Dec. 2014.

Witte, Shelbie. "That's Online Writing, Not Boring School Writing": Writing With Blogs And The Talkback Project." Journal Of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 51.2 (2007): 92-96. Academic Search Premier. Web. 7 Dec. 2014.