Unit 1- What are E-Portfolios?

Eportfolios.jpg
Image from: portfolio_samp2.jpg


Unit Learning Objectives:

After completing Unit 1, learners will be able to do the following:

  • Understand the need and importance of E-Portfolio's.
  • Have a basic understanding of information that can be found on E-Portfolios.
  • Post to a Discussion Board.

What are E-Portfolios?

Please view this example before going any further.

Welcome to Jen Boisvert's EPortfolio, author: Jen Boisvert

After looking at the example, please continue with the rest of this page. Please keep the example in the back of your mind.

So many of you are wondering what the "E" stands for? Well, the E stands for electronic. An E-Portfolio is the same thing as a paper portfolio but it can be accessed online through the Internet. Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary defines portfolio as "a selection of a student's work (as papers and tests) compiled over a period of time and used for assessing performance or progress". Lankes (1998) defines a portfolio used in education as "a collection of a student's work which can be used to demonstrate his or her skills and accomplishments"(Lankes, 1998, p. 1).

E-Portfolios serve as a form of assessment. E-Portfolios are used by people of all different ages and educational levels. E-Portfolios contain an individuals collection of their own work. E-Portfolios can be very beneficial to students. Students can display work throughout their college years. An E-Portfolio allows students to "display diverse learning styles through a variety of presentation media and allows faculty to scan collections of work quickly for evidence of specific kinds of learning" (Banta, 1999, p. 3). Lankes (1998) identifies six different educational purposes for E-Portfolios:

Developmental- includes students projects and assignments.
Proficiency- "Prove mastery in a subject area" (Lankes, 1998, p. 2).
Showcase- can house a students work throughout their college career or just in a specific course.
Teacher Planning- teachers can view students work from a previous class (if they completed an E-Portfolio from a previous year) and develop their lesson plans based upon the information they viewed.
Employment Skills- employers can "evaluate a prospective employee's work readiness skills" (Lankes, 1998, p. 2)
College Admission- "Colleges and universities are using showcase portfolios to determine eligibility for admission" (Lankes, 1998, p. 2).

A few advantages of E-Portfolios over paper portfolios:

Easy to up-date
Can be assessed around the world via the Internet
Allows individuals to demonstrate their creative ability

E-Portfolios can contain the following; resumes, design projects, cover letters, WebQuests, lesson plans, unit plans, presentations (including PowerPoint presentations), audio and video files, images, discussion boards, blogs, concept maps, rubrics, chapter plans, photos, class projects and assignments, and artwork.

Activities:

  • 1. Read the information and get familiar with E-Portfolios. Please read the unit before working on the rest of the activities.
  • 2. Read an article containing information on E-Portfolios and Assessment by Anna Maria Lankes:

File:Lankes.doc (You will need to hit the back button to return to the mini-course after reading the article).

Lankes, A.M.D. (1998). Portfolios: A New wave in assessment. T H E Journal, 25 (9). Retrieved April 16, 2008 from, Academic Search Premier.

  • 3. Complete the E-Portfolio Survey. By completing this survey, it will give me an overall view of students prior knowledge and where more time may be needed. For example, if everyone has already heard of an E-Portfolio, I may spend less time on this area and more time on another area. At the top of the survey, on the right hand side, there is a link that you can click on to take you back to the course.
  • 4. Create a Tripodaccount (you must have an e-mail address to create an account). To view a tutorial on how to create a Tripod account, click here: File:Tripod Manual.doc
  • 5. Post to the Discussion Board. Please see the Discussion Board for a tutorial on how to post to the Discussion Board.
  • 6. Look at E-Portfolio Examples:
Welcome to Career Development, author: Jen Boisvert
Welcome to My EPortfolio, author: Susan McKinstray
Victoria Walker: Instructional Designer, Web Developer, author: Victoria Walker

Reflection:

After you have completed all of the activities above, think back to the E-Portfolio Examples. Start brainstorming and jotting down ideas about your own E-Portfolio (information you want on your E-Portfolio). In addition, what types of information would you want your students to include on their E-Portfolios?

Once you have completed Unit 1, you can now move on to Unit 2- Designing an E-Portfolio.

Resources

Banta, T. W. (1999). What's New in Assessment?. Assessment Update,11(5), 3, 11. Retrieved April 14, 2008 from, Academic Search Premier. File:Banta.pdf
Lankes, A.M.D. (1998). Portfolios: A New wave in assessment. T H E Journal, 25 (9), 1-2. Retrieved April 16, 2008 from, Academic Search Premier. File:Lankes.doc
Discussion Board
Merriam-Webster Dictionary
portfolio_samp2.jpg
Survey Monkey
Tripod
Victoria Walker: Instructional Designer, Web Developer, author: Victoria Walker
Welcome to Career Development, author: Jen Boisvert
Welcome to Jen Boisvert's EPortfolio, author: Jen Boisvert
Welcome to My EPortfolio, author: Susan McKinstray


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