Talk:Using Project Based Learning to Teach The United States Constitution

From KNILT

Peer Feedback -- Susan Fenstermacher 21:25, 26 April 2011 (EDT)

Your project was informative and full of information. The pictures were a great touch and I like how you attached the lessons as pdf files as well. There were some typos that I did find while I was reading your projects:

-- In your introduction, first paragraph, secondline you have "... engaging for the learner by take..." the take should be taking
-- Under task analysis, evaluation of students you have "...Mr. Moultrie will divide the students into groups and given..." the given should be  
   give and "...students will have to present fact..." fact should be facts
-- Throughout the entire project, you go back and forth between student and students.  To me, it sounds better when you use the plural of 
   students.

Overall, I think you did a great job. I was never one for history and when I was a sub, I had a hard time teaching history. Your project and attached lessons make it easy and a bit more fun.

-- Sun Hee Seo 14:42, 29 April 2011 (EDT)

You did a great gob! I was impressed by Evaluation of the lesson. I usually focus on the Evaluation of students, sometimes missed Evaluation of the lesson. Text and pictures are informative and easy to read. Content-goal consistency is good, Instructional sequencing is OK. I give you some advice. I did not make clear student’s activities. Also to click pdf file and pop up, change File:John Marshall Court Cases.pdf into Media: John Marshall Court Cases.pdf. I have learned a lot thing from your work.

-- Lawrence Moultrie 18:48, 30 April 2011 (EDT)

Thank you for your comments. I will make sure to make the appropriate modifications. I really appreciate the feedback.

Thank you Lawrence Moultrie

Instructor comments on your draft units -- Jz833665 16:01, 3 May 2011 (EDT)

Hi Lawrence, I like the lessons you've designed to engage students in inquiry of several authentic cases, with detailed components laid out clearly.

I have a sense that your lessons could implement project-based inquiry in a deeper way. Based on the current design, students only engage in very brief inquiry activities (e.g. 10 minutes reading and developing arguments) focusing on teacher-assigned questions. You may revisit the readings on project-based learning assigned in this class. A few suggestions for you to consider:

  • Your project provides several cases for students to analyze and reflect on as they develop their understanding of the US constitution. You may further think about and elaborate on how these cases connect to one another and form into a progressive journey of learning. Do these cases represent different aspects of issues? How will these different cases be integrally reviewed by students for a synthetic, rise-above understanding? Thinking and approaching these cases as a whole instead of several projects will help you and your students focus more on the core understandings and ideas and give students a longer, continuous block of time to dig deeply into these core issues. Project-based learning is very hard to be accomplished with one or two class hours.


  • The lesson plan created for each case focuses more on what the teacher will do and offer, with very little said about the nature and process of inquiry that your students will engage in. I suggest that you elaborate more on students' processes and try your best to give them a larger role to play. For example, will they work with you to formulate inquiry questions (instead of only work on questions provided by the teacher)? Do you think using 10 minutes to read the materials and develop argument is too brief? Will students be engaged in genuine conversations to share and discuss their perspectives? ...


I know you've put a lot of thinking into this project. I just want to be helpful by sharing with you my thinking. Thank you for your comments.

Ten minutest to engage students to read and answer teacher questions is not enough. I have edited the lesson and tried to add more student engagement.The cases all connect because they all focus on different parts of the United States Constitution. Given the fact that the Constitution is a very dense document the lesson plans use cooperative learning and projects to keep the students engaged.

I have subsequently removed the the two units and developed a new Unit that is more centered on Project Based Learning. I hope that these changes are better examples of Project Based Learning.

Re: Instructor comments on your draft units -- Lawrence Moultrie 18:19, 7 May 2011 (EDT)

-- Lawrence Moultrie 17:46, 7 May 2011 (EDT)

Thank you for your comments.

  • Ten minutest to engage students to read and answer teacher questions is not enough. I have edited the lesson and tried to add more student engagement.
  • The cases all connect because they all focus on different parts of the United States Constitution. Given the fact that the Constitution is a very dense document the lesson plans use cooperative learning and projects to keep the students engaged.


I have subsequently removed the the two units and developed a new Unit that is more centered on Project Based Learning. I hope that these changes are better examples of Project Based Learning.