Naicy Pretill

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Naicy in Anacapri, Italy

About Me

!Hola! My name is Naicy Pretill and this is my first semester in Online Learning and Teaching (COLT) program at Sunny Albany. I am from Peru.I earned my Bachelor’s Degree in Linguistic and Literature in Colombia, and I pursued my Master of Arts in Teaching Foreign Languages –Spanish at Manhattanville College. Today I am teaching Spanish for beginners and advanced at Westchester Community College and Purchase College. I am also a part-time teacher in a high school.


My Topic/Purpose

How to get student to stay in the target language and avoid speaking the native language in class? I will be completing a mini course on how to stay in the target language at least 90% plus. In this course I will provide practical strategies to maximize the target language use with novice, and to avoid being tune out of the target language by our students. American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) recommends that languages educators, at all level, should stay in the target language 90% during instructional time. So, language learners acquire a high degree of ability to speak the language and become citizen of the world.

Needs Assessment

Part I: Intent

Language educators are committed to and based on the new revised World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages (2014). These standards continue to address the five goals area: Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparison, and Communities. According to its page, the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) encourages to world languages classrooms to use the target language for more than 90% plus during school time and beyond the classroom. Therefore, language educator would appreciate to have practical strategies to get students speaking the language.


Part II: Gathering Data:

I conducted a survey to find out how much target language use in the languages classes. 21 high school and college language educators (French, Spanish, Chinese, Latin, Germany, and ELLS) volunteered to fill out the anonymous survey. The purpose of this survey is to investigate and assess the need of 95% plus target language in the world language classroom as recommended by World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages (2014). Over one week, 19 participants responded to the survey.


File:Survey- 90% plus of the target language.pdf


Part III: Data Results:

I have found more than 90% of languages educators responded favorably to the use of 90% plus the target language in the modern language classrooms. Also, I found that a range from 25% to 80% of use the students’ L1 (English) in most of the participants’ language classrooms. However, the majority of the participants agree that the use of L1 and target language should be seen as a complementary, depending of the characteristics and stage of the language stage. For the purpose of using 90 % plus the target language, they are very interesting to obtain practical strategies to foster the target language use.

Analysis of the Learner and Context

Type of Learners

This mini-course is designed for all language educators (K-12) who wish to use the target language 90% plus in their world language classrooms. Participants will make use the ACTFL guidelines to keep in the target language, and they are going to create, adapt, or select practical strategies that best fit with their teaching styles and best work in their workplace.


Instructional Context

This mini-course is self-paced, and it will be conducted fully online. Participants will need a computer with internet access. This mini-course can be used in a professional development day for k-12 languages teachers. Participants will benefit with the ready-to-use materials, and these materials will be available to download at not cost. Unfortunately, after this course is launched, it will not have ongoing maintenance, and participant will not received feedback from instructor.

Performance Objectives

At the end of this course students will be able to:


• Raise awareness of the need for the increase in the target language

• Present practical strategies to foster the target language use

• Interpret the ACTFL, World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages and can-do statements: Progress indicators for language learners.


Task Analysis

Unit 1: Why language educators should maximize target language usages?

1 Participants will be able to define comprehensible input

2. Participants will be able to develop a logic argument on the benefit of staying in the target language recommended by ACTFL.

3. Participants will be able to become more aware of the need for reaching the 90% plus target.


Unit 2: How can language educator be in the target language for at least 90% plus?


1. Participants will be able to be exposed to various strategies to stay in the target language.

2. Participants will be able to watch videos that describe the strategies.

3. Participants will be able to select one strategy that fit best with student’s personality.

4. Participants will be able to practice and implement the strategies in their language classroom.


Unit 3: When educators should use 10% of the native language (L1)?

1. Understand when the native language use can be helpful.

Curriculum Map

Click here to see a curriculum map for the course. File:Curriculum Map.pdf

References and Resources

A. J., & Yu, F. (2015). NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements: An Effective Tool for Improving Language Learning within and outside the Classroom. Dimension, 50-69.

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Modern Language Association of America. The ACTFL review of foreign language education. [Skokie, Ill.] :National Textbook Co.

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (1986). ACTFL proficiency guidelines 1986. Retrieved from http://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/ public/ACTFLProficiencyGuidelines1986.pdf

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (1998). ACTFL performance guidelines for K-12 learners. Retrieved from http://www.actfl.org/publications/ guidelines-and-manuals/actfl-performance-descriptors-language-learners 66 Dimension 2015

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (1999). ACTFL proficiency guidelines-Speaking revised 1999. Retrieved from, http://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/public/Guidelines.pdf

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (2001). Preliminary proficiency guidelines-Writing revised 2001. Retrieved from http://www.actfl. org/sites/default/files/pdfs/public/writingguidelines.pdf

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (2012a). ACTFL proficiency guidelines 2012. Retrieved from, http://actflproficiencyguidelines2012.org/

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (2012b). ACTFL performance descriptors for language learners. Retrieved from, http://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/PerformanceDescriptorsLanguageLearners.pdf

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (2013a). NCSSFL-ACTFL can-do statements: Progress indicators for language learners. Retrieved from, http://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/Can-Do_Statements.pdf

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (2013b). NCSSFLACTF global Can-Do benchmarks. Retrieved from, http://www.actfl.org/ global_statements

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Y. N. (1998). ACTFL Performance Guidelines for K-12 Learners.

Littlewood, W., & Yu, B. (2011). First language and target language in the foreign language classroom. Language Teaching, 44(1), 64-77.

Turnbull, M., & Arnett, K. (2002). 11. TEACHERS' USES OF THE TARGET AND FIRST LANGUAGES IN SECOND AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 22, 204-218.