Module 4: Assessing Student Comprehension of Dialectal Variation

From KNILT

Introduction: Learning Goals and Objectives

Throughout the course of this module, you will obtain knowledge on how to successfully assess student comprehension of dialectal variation within the Spanish as a foreign language classroom. Upon the successful completion of the corresponding assignments for this module, you will be able to:

  • Assess student progress regarding knowledge of dialectal variation.
  • Address negative ideologies surrounding dialectal variation.
  • Set learning goals that incorporate centering the knowledge of dialectal variation.

Creating Effective Learning Goals and Objectives for Students

According to Larson and Lockee (2020) in the chapter titled, “Design Outcomes and Alignment” student learning objectives designed by instructors should guide the way in which the instructor teaches, and learning objectives should also be relevant and transparent to students throughout the duration of the learning process. Larson and Lockee (2020) note that learners should be advised about the learning outcomes for each corresponding lesson for the subject matter. One way in which educators can improve their learning objectives for their students is utilizing the SMART outcome system, which entails that learning objectives such be specific, measurable, action-oriented, realistic, and timely (Larson & Lockee, 2020).


Moreover, McTighe and Wiggins (2012) discuss the UbD or “Understanding by Design” Framework, in which three stages are utilized in order to create and assess student learning objectives (McTighe & Wiggins, 2012). The primary tenants of the Understanding by Design framework are that the three stages of the framework need to concord accurately with necessary guidelines and with each other (McTighe & Wiggins, 2012). In Stage, 1 the substance of the lesson and the comprehension of the lesson is subsequently evaluated within Stage 2 and then is implemented and taught throughout the duration of Stage 3.

Based on the research conducted by Larson and Lockee (2020) in addition to McTighe and Wiggins (2012), learning outcomes should focus on transfer, meaning making and acquisition and should be relevant for each corresponding lesson. Each lesson should have a clear learning outcome that guides learners as a short-term goal, however, this short-term goal should always correspond to a “wider” end-goal of concepts and ideals that learners should be able to transfer and apply in a meaningful way, and demonstrate true understanding and comprehension skills of the subject matter taught throughout the unit or curriculum.

First, the goals and learning objective must be thoughtfully and carefully thought-out, and then, methods of evaluation or assessment of these learning goals must be discovered in order to evaluate whether or not learners are truly grasping the material taught. Finally, the corresponding lesson plans, activities, and learning exercises should be created in order to implement them to employ within the classroom environment. Learning objectives and goals can be made clearer for students by utilizing language that they will understand, and ensuring that they understand how each goal and objective relates to the wider end-goal of the unit or curriculum.

Addressing Negative Ideologies Surrounding Dialectal Variation

Read the following articles regarding ideologies surrounding specific dialects of Spanish.

[Read]

  1. Monerris Oliveras, L. (2015). Spanish dialectal variation in the foreign language classroom: Students' attitudes, instructors' beliefs and teaching practices, and treatment of variation in textbooks.
  1. Carter, P. M., & Callesano, S. (2018). The social meaning of Spanish in Miami: Dialect perceptions and implications for socioeconomic class, income, and employment. Latino Studies, 16, 65-90.

[Article Link]

Considering what you have learned from the past three modules, and the previous two readings, answer the following reflection questions:

  1. What are the prevailing ideologies surrounding specific dialects of Spanish?
  2. How do these prejudices and biases appear in curriculum or through the ideologies of other Spanish language learners or speakers?
  3. What are some ways to combat these prejudices and biases within your own classroom instruction?

Record your answers in the following google forum.

[Link] Google Forum Answer Submission

Activity: Preparing for Module 4 Final Project

Considering what you have learned about learning goals and objectives,  dialectal variation, as well as ideologies surrounding dialectal variation, reflect on how you will begin to utilize what you have learned to create a mini-lesson that integrates exposure to dialectal variation within your final project for Module 4.

  1. Fill in the following table summarizing the following ideas: Different Dialects of Spanish and their Linguistic Features, Prevailing Attitudes Surrounding Different Dialects of Spanish, Ways to Integrate Dialectal Variation within your Spanish Language Instruction.

[Table]

[Chart]

2. Fill in the following chart to create your learning goals that you would like for your students to achieve by the end of the mini-lesson. Center the goals around the comprehension of dialectal variation.


3. Create an outline for a mini-lesson plan that you can use to guide your lesson construction for Module 5. You may use the following template as a guideline:



[Template]

Click here to continue to Module 5.


Click here to return to Module 3.

References

Carter, P. M., & Callesano, S. (2018). The social meaning of Spanish in Miami: Dialect perceptions and implications for socioeconomic class, income, and employment. Latino Studies, 16, 65-90.

Larson, M. B. and Lockee, B. B. (2020). Streamlined ID: A Practical Guide to Instructional Design (2nd edition). New York, NY: Routledge

McTighe & Wiggins (2012). The Understanding by Design®  Framework.  Alexandra, VA: ASCD. http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/siteASCD/publications/UbD_WhitePaper0312.pdf

Monerris Oliveras, L. (2015). Spanish dialectal variation in the foreign language classroom: Students' attitudes, instructors' beliefs and teaching practices, and treatment of variation in textbooks.