Module 3: USING PROCESS-BASED SKILLS TO CREATE EFFECTIVE PARAPHRASES

Back to ELIZABETH'S MINI-COURSE ON PATCHWRITING

Welcome to Module 3.

OVERVIEW

OBJECTIVES

3.1 Use critical reading strategies to create effective paraphrases
3.2 Use revision strategies to create effective paraphrases


Process.gif


The Writing Process, or process-based writing, refers to the idea that writing happens in stages that move between prewriting, drafting, feedback from peers and instructor, revision, and completion. Note that the arrows go in both directions on the image above; that's because writing involves a "feedback loop." Writing is thinking and thinking is writing. So, as you write, you'll necessarily come up with new ideas and want to go back to the drawing board, so to speak. And, because you're writing for an audience, you'll want to make sure that what you write makes sense to eyes and ears other than your own. Once you get feedback, you'll likely return to revise. As we move into creating your final product for this class, your paraphrase, you'll want to make sure you're following the steps of process-based writing.

Mini-Lesson 3.1

Click on the link above to read Mini-Lesson 3.1 about how practicing critical reading skills can help you to avoid patchwriting while also helping you to write effective paraphrases.

Mini-Lesson 3.2

Click on the link above to read Mini-Lesson 3.2 about how drafting and revision can help you to write effective paraphrases.


PEER ACTIVITY

Peerfeedback1.png

At this point, you should have a free paraphrase of the passage from Mini-lesson 3.2 written. Let's see if your peers agree that it's an effective paraphrase free of patchwriting.Remember when, in Module 1 we examined a case-study and applied the rules of paraphrasing to identify errors and accidental plagiarism/patchwriting? We're going to do the same thing now, only with YOUR draft.

DIRECTIONS FOR PEER ACTIVITY:

Finding a Peer
If this is a face-to-face class, your instructor can put you into groups and have you exchange drafts. If this is a course being taken online, you should use the Google Excel [[1]] peer response worksheet to choose a peer partner. Email your draft to your peer and within 24 hours do the following:
Giving Your Peer Feedback
After you've read your peer's attempted paraphrase, write a short letter to your peer (5-7 sentences) in which you identify any errors you see. Upon completion, submit your letter to your peer AND your instructor. If you are taking this course in an LMS like ANGEL or Blackboard, your professor may have provided you a dropbox. Alternately, you can write your letter in Googledocs and share/email it to your professor and your peer.
Your letter to your peer should include the following:


1. If patchwritten syntax exists, did you identify it and suggest a way to fix it?
2. If patchwritten phrasing exists, did you identify it and suggest a way to fix it?
3. If patchwritten word use exists, did you identify it and suggest a way to fix it?
4. If blatant plagiarism exists, did you identify it?
5. Did you provide feedback to your peer about what she has done well?
When you receive your draft back from your peer with feedback, make any revisions necessary to polish it before submitting it to your professor.

TIME TO REFLECT

Before you submit your draft and final paraphrase to your professor, write a reflective paragraph about your writing process. What did you struggle with? What did you learn to do? What questions do you still have? Look again at the plagiarism policy you helped to draft in Module 2. Do you feel like your attempt at paraphrasing meets the policy requirements for academic honesty?


When you are ready, email your drafts with your final draft clearly marked to your professor.

CONGRATULATIONS! YOU HAVE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED MY MINI-COURSE!

Course completion.png