Melanie Gifford Portfolio

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About me

I am currently a third year math teacher at George Junior Republic UFSD. I teach juvenile delinquents at a residential facility grades 7-12. We use Therapeutic Crisis Intervention (TCI) to help maintain a safe school environment, emotionally and physically. I went to Le Moyne College and graduated with my BA in Mathematics with a concentration in Adolescent and Special Education. I hold my initial teaching certification in Adolescent Mathematics Education grades 7-12. I am the chair of the Dryden Teachers' Center. This center allows teachers to hold workshops for each other and to earn CTLE credit. I am also the Union Treasurer for my school district.

Purpose

This mini-course will help educators, administrators, and school personnel understand what PBIS is and how to successfully use it with their intended students. An educational environment in which students have no motivation or incentives to do well, or do the correct thing, can be boring and can have negative effects on the learning process. All educators should understand the applications associated with Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS).

Topics to be covered:

What is PBIS?

What are some examples of PBIS?

What are the pros and cons of using PBIS?

Why is PBIS important and relevant to educators?

What are some tips for successfully implementing PBIS?

Learning Outcomes

The purpose of this course is to inform educators on how to effectively use Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) with their students.

Learners will be able to:

  • Analyze the advantages and challenges of using PBIS.
  • List real-life examples of when and why PBIS is used and counter-examples of when and why PBIS is not used.
  • Identify areas in which PBIS could be beneficial for their students.
  • Determine whether PBIS would be effective or not given their current students and population.
  • Create a potential PBIS opportunity for their students.

Needs Assessment

Instructional Problem

As times change, so does the population of our students. You may ask why you should reward positive behavior from your students. Using punishment-based strategies to handle misbehavior have proven to not be beneficial or effective. Students in the 21st century have moved towards having an instant response, whether it is good or bad. For example, if they search someone on Google, a response is given, or if they post something on social media, they receive feedback. This constant need for attention may lead students to misbehave in seek of such attention and feedback, without knowing how to do it positively.

The problem that some teachers may face is the frustration of why students do not behave well on their own. One potential reason could be the lack of values taught at home, in the community, or lack of motivation to have good behavior. Teachers might also struggle with implementing positive strategies, because they may not feel it reflects the 'real-world.' For example, you could drive the speed limit everyday and not be rewarded, but the one time you speed, you could potentially be given a speeding ticket. The goal would be to motivate students to begin doing the right thing, so they eventually can do it without supports and rewards, such as using scaffolding in the classroom.

What is to be Learned

Learners will learn components of PBIS and why it is used. Learners will learn how to effectively implement Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports with their students.

Goals

The main goal of this mini-course is for participates to gain a better understanding of the negative effects of punishment-based behavior management and the positive effects of using Positive Based Interventions and Supports. Another goal of this mini-course would be to provide the learners the tools necessary so they can effectively develop and implement Positive Based Interventions and Supports if they deem it necessary for their intended population of students.

Analysis of the Learner and Context

The Learners

Learners will include all educators and school personnel. This includes teachers, teaching assistants and aids, administrators, bus drivers, custodians, cafeteria employees, etc. All individuals who interact with students on a professional level will be considered learners for this course.

Instructional Context

Content for this mini-course will be available online. Learners will be able to access the materials on this mini-course in any location as long as they have internet access on an electronic device. This includes computers, laptops, phones, and tablets.

Exploring the Problem and Solution

The sections in this mini-course will allow the learners to explore the problems associated with punishment-based strategies for managing behavior. Teachers often lack strategies at managing behavior in all academic settings. Participates will be able to develop their own Positive Based Interventions and Supports for their intended audience.

Performance Objectives

After completing this course, learners will be able to:

  • Understand the concept and process of PBIS.
  • Interpret the advantages and challenges of using PBIS in academic settings.
  • Analyze their current behavior management strategies in order to make potential changes.
  • Develop a Positive Behavior Intervention plan for their current population of students.

Task Analysis

Unit 1: Learners will identify the advantages and challenges of using PBIS.

Lesson 1 goal: Learners will analyze components of videos and written examples of PBIS.

Activities:

  • Learners will watch a video about PBIS.
  • Learners will read real-world examples of PBIS.
  • Learners will write down key features of the video and written samples.

Assessment:

  • Learners will take a multiple-choice quiz on the components of the video and written definitions of PBIS.


Lesson 2 goal: Learners will identify the advantages and challenges of using PBIS.

Activities:

  • Learners will read an article and watch a video about the advantages of using PBIS.
  • Learners will read an article and watch a video about the challenges of using PBIS.

Assessment:

  • Learners will problem solve, using guided questions and instruction, to identify the advantages and challenges of using PBIS.


Unit 2: Learners will identify areas in which PBIS could be beneficial for their students and determine if PBIS would be effective or not.

Unit 2 goal: Learners will list areas where PBIS could be used with their current population of students. Learners will then reflect on their own teaching and determine if PBIS would be something they could use.

Activities:

  • Learners will reflect on their current population of students using guided questions.
  • Learners will be given a series of questions to help identify areas where PBIS could be used.
  • Learners will be given reflective prompts, such as, "How do your students behave? Do they behave appropriately? If so, how do you know?"
  • Learners will write down what strategies are working for the classrooms.
  • Learners will be encouraged to ask their colleagues and students for what they observe in their classroom (positives and negatives).

Assessments:

  • Learners will create a list to identify areas where PBIS could be used with their students.
  • Learners will reflect on their own instructional experiences to determine if they should implement PBIS.


Unit 3: Learners will create a potential PBIS opportunity for their students.

Unit 3 goal: Learners will create a PBIS plan to implement in their classrooms.

Activities.

  • Learners will be provided a decision-making chart to brainstorm and identify an area of need of PBIS and an intended goal/outcome of using PBIS.
  • Learners will use an outline to create a PBIS plan, using the decision-making chart they created.

Assessment:

  • Learners will create their own PBIS plan to potentially use with their current population of students using outlines and decision-making charts.

Curriculum Map

File:PBIS Map.pdf

References and Resources