Lesson 4: CRT in Other Content Areas

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Lesson 4 Objective and Accessibility

  • Objective: Learners will outline, draft, and finalize lesson materials to be implemented in their own classrooms. They will rely on the reading from Lesson 1, the example provided in Lesson 2, and the resources they found, were exposed to, or developed in Lesson 3.
  • Digital Platform(s): File sharing platform (Dropbox, OneDrive, Google Drive, hyperlink, etc.)
  • Pre-requisites: Device with access to the internet and ability to create and share lesson materials via some file sharing platform (Dropbox, OneDrive, Google Drive, hyperlink, etc.).

Your Learning Outcomes

As stated as a primary objective of this course—by the end of our work together, you will have your very own curriculum materials, uniquely crafted to suit the needs of your students. In order to obtain this goal, in our final lesson, we will outline the steps to be taken for each of us to learn something from one another and come out with finished products that we are excited to use for the benefit of all of our students.

What makes a good learning outcome?

What learning outcome(s) do you have in mind for your lesson? When designing your lesson, be sure to keep in mind the following objectives for addressing cultural relevance with your content area:

  • Employ collaborative, discursive, problem-solving and problem-posing pedagogies which promote the engagement of learners with the content;
  • Recognize and draw upon learners’ real-life experiences in order to emphasize the cultural relevance of the content;
  • Promote inquiries that enable learners to develop greater understanding of their social, cultural, political and economic situations;
  • Facilitate investigations that develop learners’ agency, enabling them to take part in social action and realize their foregrounds;
  • Develop a critical understanding of the nature of the content and its position and status within education and society

Adapted from "Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice: Translating Theories into Practice." Wright, Pete. 2015.

Lesson 4, Assignment 1

ASSIGNMENT Discussion: Lesson 4, Prompt A: Draft your learning outcomes. Review the submissions from your classmates and modify your outline as you see fit.

Your Lesson Outline

Map as Media (Rethinking Mathematics. Eric Gutstein, Bob Peterson. 2015.)

What are the key components of a lesson outline?


As you begin to craft your lesson outline, consider the framework for culturally responsive teaching put forth by Raymond J. Wlodkowski and Margery B. Ginsberg (1995):

The framework names four motivational conditions that the teacher and students continuously create or enhance. They are:

  • Establishing inclusion—creating a learning atmosphere in which students and teachers feel respected by and connected to one another.
  • Developing attitude—creating a favorable disposition toward the learning experience through personal relevance and choice.
  • Enhancing meaning—creating challenging, thoughtful learning experiences that include student perspectives and values.
  • Engendering competence—creating an understanding that students are effective in learning something they value.

"A Framework for Culturally Responsive Teaching." Raymond J. Wlodkowski and Margery B. Ginsberg. 1995.

Equations as Media (Rethinking Mathematics. Eric Gutstein, Bob Peterson. 2015.)

In your outline, be sure to include the varied media sources and modes of communication you plan to incorporate—whether in print, online, or in the form of discussion. In Rethinking Mathematics: Teaching Social Justice by the Numbers, authors Eric Gutstein and Bob Peterson provide dozens of examples of lesson outlines that can be adapted for use depending on the context in which a teacher finds themselves. Within those sketches, a myriad of media arises, creating a varied and continually engaging experience for the students. Some examples from their book are featured along the right side of this wiki page to give you inspiration as you write your outline with engagement in mind.

Lesson 4, Assignment 2

ASSIGNMENT Discussion: Lesson 4, Prompt B: Draft your lesson outline and attach a link here. Read through the submissions of your peers and modify your own work as you see fit. Review the submissions from your classmates and modify your outline as you see fit.

Cartoon as Media (Rethinking Mathematics. Eric Gutstein, Bob Peterson. 2015.




Your Lesson Plan

Differentiation and Scaffolding Once the general structure of the lesson is in place, with its overarching content established, references mined, and media curated, we will polish the lesson by providing differentiation and scaffolding so that all levels of learners in your classroom have equitable access to a rigorous learning experience. In their 2015 article, Five Dimensions of Differentiation, Dr. Joe Renzulli and Dr. Sally Reis provide the following visual to aid in this process:

5 dimensions of differentiation - Dr. Joe Renzulli and Dr. Sally Reis.png

When crafting your final lesson, keep in mind that the goal of CRT is to connect to all students, of all backgrounds, and this step of differentiation is absolutely pivotal to granting that access.

Lesson 4, Assignment 3

ASSIGNMENT Discussion: Lesson 4, Prompt C:

In your lesson plan, make explicit how each element of Renzulli and Reis' differentiation dimensions is considered from a culturally relevant perspective.

Submit your completed lesson plan via an attached link. Read through the submissions of your peers and modify your own work as you see fit. Review the submissions from your classmates and modify your outline as you see fit.

References and Resources

Gutstein, Eric Rico. “Rethinking Mathematics: Teaching Social Justice by the Numbers by Eric Rico Gutstein.” Powell's Books, 2005, www.powells.com/book/rethinking-mathematics-9780942961553.

Hammond, Zaretta. Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain: Promoting Authentic Engagement and Rigor among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students. Corwin, 2015.

Reis, Sally & Renzulli, Joseph. (2015). Compass White Paper On the Five Dimensions of Differentiation. Gifted Education Press Quarterly. 29. 2-9.

Wlodkowski, Raymond J., and Margery B. Ginsberg. “A Framework for Culturally Responsive Teaching.” A Framework for Culturally Responsive Teaching - Educational Leadership, 1995, www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept95/vol53/num01/A-Framework-for-Culturally-Responsive-Teaching.aspx.

Wright, Pete. “Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice: Translating Theories into Practice.” University of Sussex, 2015, sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/53984/.

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