Leigh Olivari

From KNILT

Return to: ETAP 623 Spring 2017 | Teaching the History of Popular Music


About me

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I attended Hofstra University, where I received my B.S. in Education, majoring in Music Education and specializing in General Music/Choir. I'm currently a substitute teacher for Plainview Old Bethpage on Long Island. In addition, I volunteer with the John F. Kennedy High School Drama Cadets as a Production Assistant for their spring musicals, aiding in various different tasks. I also work with the district's Thespian Honor Society, creating a video slideshow that showcases the past for years of the current graduating class during their annual Induction Dinner.

I enjoy reading (especially fantasy novels) and writing when I get some spare time. I especially love Broadway and Disney.

The Purpose of My Mini-Course

When music educators talk about teaching music history, they tend to focus on certain periods in history, such as the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, and Romantic eras. However, students live in the modern era, and the history of today’s popular music is just as important. This course is intended to instruct music teachers how to approach the evolution of popular music from the 1950s to the present day, as well as to teach these educators how to use Google Docs and Google Slides.

Needs Assessment and Learner Analysis

Instructional Problems

Teachers tend to focus on older periods of music history rather than the contemporary music that is relevant to today's students. Additionally, as the use of Google Docs and Google Slides is still being introduced into the classroom environment, many teachers do not yet have the skill to use these programs effectively in their instruction.

What Is To Be Learned

Learners will be instructed how to address modern artists and musical styles in their classrooms. The content will feature examples of both appropriate and inappropriate material for each artist and style presented. Learners will also be taught the different functions of the Google Docs and Google Slides programs, culminating in the creation of class notes and the slide show presentation for the final project.

The Learner

The target audience for this course is middle school and high school general music teachers, specifically those who teach grades 7 or 8 to 12. These learners will benefit most, due to the nature of the course material. However, teachers who work with elementary and middle school students grades K to 6 would also benefit from the Google Docs and Google Slides training, and the course material can be slightly adjusted to accommodate these needs.

Instructional Context

The mini-course will be divided into four units, which will be listed as follows:

  • Unit 1: The 1950s and 1960s
  • Unit 2: The 1970s and 1980s
  • Unit 3: The 1990s and the 2000s
  • Unit 4: Using Google Docs and Google Slides

Units 1, 2, and 3 will cover both the styles and artists of the decades. These units will also feature information about what is considered appropriate content and what is considered inappropriate content. Each of the first three units will end with a test and a quiz. The test will be based on the presented material on the artists and styles. The quiz will check how well learners understand the difference between appropriate content and inappropriate content. Unit 4 is dedicated to learning the functions of the two Google programs. Throughout this unit, learners will be asked to use these programs to create their final project. For this project, each learner will pick an artist from any of the decades talked about throughout the course. They will then use Google Slide Show to create a presentation about their artist and Google Docs to create sample class notes to go with their presentation.

This course will require learners to have access to a computer or tablet that can access the internet.

Goals of the Mini-Course

The purpose of this course is for music educators to learn more about the music of the modern era, as well as to instruct them of how to present it to their students. Secondly, it is hoped that those who take this course will feel more comfortable incorporating new computer programs (such as Google Docs and Google Slides) as part of their instruction.

Performance Objectives

By the end of this course, learners will be able to:

  1. identify the important genres for each decade
  2. identify appropriate content [music videos and/or songs] to showcase as examples during lessons
  3. be able to incorporate the programs Google Docs and Goodgle Slides into their lessons as a means of enhancing the classroom experience

Task Analysis

Course Purpose:

This course is intended to instruct music teachers how to teach their students about the history of popular music from the 1950s to the present day, as well as to show these teachers how to use Google Docs and Google Slides.

Performance Outcomes:

By the end of this course, learners will be able to:

  1. identify the important genres for each decade
  2. identify appropriate content [music videos and/or songs] to showcase as examples during lessons
  3. be able to incorporate the programs Google Docs and Goodgle Slides into their lessons as a means of enhancing the classroom experience

Prerequisites:

Essential Prerequisites

In order to complete the course, learners must:

  • Have a basic understanding of computers and use of the internet
  • Understand the musical interest of their students

Supportive Prerequisites

For easier access of reaching course outcomes, learners should:

  • Have a basic understanding of music history

Curriculum Map

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1nTO6LdbB-9wRk1lhWQ7nWvuCCqSmo4Ivojr8FW65ybo/edit#slide=id.p

References and Resources

Himes, Geoffrey (2015). Why We Should Teach Music History Bacwards. Retrieved from: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/why-we-should-teach-music-history-backwards-180955053/

Staff Writers (2013). Cool Teachers' Guide to Pop Culture in the Classroom. Retrieved from: http://www.onlineuniversities.com/blog/2013/03/cool-teachers-guide-pop-culture-classroom/