Brooke Chandler's profile

Return to: Brooke Chandler Mini-Course

About me

Teaching in Guatemala.jpeg

I am an MS student in the Curriculum Development and Instructional Technology program at SUNY Albany. I received my undergrad in Adolescent Education with a concentration in Math and Special Education at Roberts Wesleyan College in Rochester, NY. I currently work with 10th-graders in a Special Education Resource Room in the suburbs of Albany, NY.

My Topic/Purpose

The course Gaming in High School Mathematics was created for ETAP 623 class. This fully online course will explore the theory, research, and practice of games within a math course, with a particular focus on how games can create a hands-on curriculum for kinesthetic learners. Furthermore, the course aims to:

  • Inform how game design principles can enhance a well-designed curriculum
  • Evaluate learning outcomes with digital contexts
  • Identify good learning games for several math curricula

I based this mini-course off of Caro Williams-Pierce's Suny Albany Graduate class, ETAP 534 Introduction to Gaming for Learning: Theory and Practice.

Needs Assessment

1. Instructional problem: Research has demonstrated that engaging students in the learning process increase their attention and focus, motivates them to practice higher-level critical thinking skills and promotes meaningful learning experiences. With a growing need for engaging material in the classroom, gaming can help with building an emotional connection to learning and subject matter, providing the opportunity for feedback and practice, and customizing the curriculum to individualized teaching.

2. The nature of what is to be learned: Gaming in High School Mathematics aims to:

  • Inform how game design principles can enhance a well-designed curriculum
  • Evaluate learning outcomes with digital contexts
  • Identify good learning games for several math curricula

3. About the learners: This course is for current or future high school mathematics teachers, who are interested in the results that gaming can have when integrated into a mathematics classroom, whether the instructor plays games already or not! Each round students must discuss how they interpret the content. This is a platform to learn from one another with guided content. As this course is fully online, students communicate through the platform and email.

4. Research:

Active learning requires students to participate in class and teaching with technology can deepen students learning by supporting the instructional objectives. A national survey from the Pew Internet & American Life Project found that 97% of two to seventeen-year-olds play video games and nearly two-thirds of young Americans play games while interacting with their friends and family. Game-based learning can be questionable but when given good games—as opposed to candy-coated, multiple-choice quiz games—provide immersive experiences for students. Research firm SRI International released this 2014 meta-analysis suggesting that digital game use among students is shown to significantly enhance student learning outcomes when studied in comparison to similar non-game learning conditions. Nearly 3/4 of teachers using digital games report that games have been effective in improving students' mathematics learning. However, most teachers want help to find curriculum-aligned games that lend themselves to in-depth exploration and complex problem-solving. This course is here to help.

Check it out the research for yourself:

Video Gaming Can Increase Brain Size and Connectivity

Level Up Learning

Making people fail: Failing to learn through games and making


5. Explore Instruction: As you might suspect, participants will need reliable access to a computer with reliable internet in order to succeed in this course. Below are some tips and points to think about as you prepare for the course:

First, develop a back-up plan in case you have computer or internet problems. Think of friends and/or family members who have computers you could use if yours fails. In addition, identify local locations where you can use a computer and/or connect to the internet (library, cafe).

This course will be run using some design elements from games, as it makes sense to learn about game-based learning through a game-based course. I wanted to bring in some of the basic elements of games that support learning but aren't generally used in classrooms. In this class, every student comes in at Level 0, with 0 experience points, and has to earn their way up. This game involves three levels with three rounds each. To earn experience points, you complete assignments or missions in each round. Different missions earn different points and the amount of points earned is determined by me. Each round will provide required missions and optional missions. The more points earned, the higher the grade.

6. Generate goals:

  • To increase comfort with games and technology
  • To increase in understanding and using games as learning and teaching tools
  • To increase design thinking
  • To increase an understanding of the complex cultural nature of games (like any other art produced within a society by an individual or group)
  • To be successful in the class

Performance Objectives

1. Given a curriculum, the educator will be able to identify 2-3 game design principles used within the curriculum.

2. Given a game, the educator will be able to evaluate 2-3 learning outcomes from the design.

3. The educator will be able to state 3-5 learning games to add to their math curricula.

Task Analysis

Module 1: Game Design Principles

James Paul Gee is an influential participant in the development of game-based learning. Gee created 36 principles in the way gaming and learning strategies connect. We learn about Gee and his principles for an understanding of why game-based learning books.


1.1 James Paul Gee
Blooms: Understand


1.2 The 36 Learning Principles
Blooms: Apply


1.3 Game Design principles within the curriculum
Blooms: Analyze


Activities:

  • Each round students must discuss how they interpret the content. As the participants are or are going to be math educators, this is a platform to learn from one another with guided content.

Assessment: Each lesson students will submit a commentary that includes three things that they found thought-provoking. Then, respond to at least once to the comments and thoughts of others.

Module 2: Learning Outcomes

When creating game-based lesson plans, educators need to be aware of the student's end goal. Getting lost in the action of the game can be tempting. Game-based learning needs to provide a clear learning outcome.


2.1 Learning Outcomes
Blooms: Remember


2.2 Games for Learning
Blooms: Analyze


2.3 Outcomes in Games
Blooms: Evaluate

Activities:

  • Each round students must discuss how they interpret the content. As the participants are or are going to be math educators, this is a platform to learn from one another with guided content.

Assessment: Each lesson students will submit a commentary that includes three things that they found thought-provoking. Then, respond to at least once to the comments and thoughts of others.

Module 3: Learning Games

The last module wraps up the course by providing useful game-based lesson tools and students share finals thoughts.


3.1 Game-Based Tools
Blooms: Apply


3.2 Final Round
Blooms: Evaluate


Activities:

  • Participates view and play useful game-based lessons to adapt to the classroom

Assessment: Students say there final thoughts towards game-based learning.

References and Resources

Chess, Shira, and Paul Booth. “Lessons down a Rabbit Hole: Alternate Reality Gaming in the Classroom.” New Media & Society, vol. 16, no. 6, 2013

Clark, Douglas B., et al. “Digital Games, Design, and Learning.” Review of Educational Research, vol. 86, no. 1, 2016, pp. 79–122.

“Curriculum.” Quest to Learn (Q2L) - Middle School and High School, www.q2l.org/upper-school/curriculum/.

Drigas, Athanasios, and Marios Pappas. “On Line and Other Game-Based Learning for Mathematics.” International Journal of Online Engineering (IJOE), vol. 11, no. 4, 2015

Effects of Game-Based Learning on Students’ Mathematics ... education.fsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Umit-Tokac.pdf.

Gee, J. P. (2007). Good Video Games and Good Learning.

Jackson, Janna. “Game‐Based Teaching: What Educators Can Learn from Videogames.” Teaching Education, vol. 20, no. 3, 2009, pp. 291–304.

Kang, H. (n.d.). How Game-based Learning Can Support Strong Math Practices. Retrieved from https://blog.mindresearch.org/blog/game-based-learning-infographic

Karou, Ki. “Using Game-Based Learning in the Classroom.” Video: Using Game-Based Learning in the Classroom, blog.mindresearch.org/blog/game-based-learning-productive-struggle.

“Learning Principles*.” James Paul Gee: Learning Principles, mason.gmu.edu/~lsmithg/jamespaulgee2print.html.