Assessing for Understanding in Online Courses

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Designer information: Mary Huffman's Portfolio Page

Introduction

This course addresses the unique challenges presented by assessing online learning. Learning online is different than learning in a traditional classroom, so logically, assessing this learning will also be different. Topics addressed will include the the challenges of online learning, the difference between understanding and remembering, types of assessment questions and their relationship to Bloom’s Taxonomy, writing effective multiple choice questions, and alternative assessment methods.

Performance Objectives

  • When asked by peers, the participant can state in their own words what constitutes understanding, how it differs from knowing, and give two examples of the difference between learning and understanding in their own teaching situation.
  • Given examples of types of assessment questions, the participant will classify the questions by the thinking skills they require to solve them.
  • Given a core concept that students need to understand, participants will be able to create an effective multiple choice question to assess student understanding, as well as describe strategies to provide feedback to promote understanding.
  • Given a core concept that students need to understand, participants will give examples of two authentic assessment methods that could be used in an online course to assess the concept.


Please click on Unit 1 to begin this course.

Unit 1 - Understanding vs. Knowing

Knowingcheck.jpg Objective: When asked by peers, the learner can state in their own words what constitutes understanding, how it differs from remembering, and give two examples of the difference between learning and understanding in their own teaching situation.

Unit 2 - Assessment Questions and Bloom's Taxonomy

Knowingcheck.jpg Objective: Given examples of types of assessment questions, the learner will classify the questions by the thinking skills they require to solve them.

Unit 3 - Multiple Choice Questions in Online Courses

Knowingcheck.jpg Objective: Given a core concept that students need to understand, learners will be able to create an effective multiple choice question to assess student understanding, as well as describe strategies to provide feedback to promote understanding.

Unit 4 - Alternative Assessment Methods in Online Courses

Knowingcheck.jpg Objective: Given a core concept that students need to understand, learners will give examples of two authentic assessment methods that could be used in an online course to assess the concept.

References

(n.d.). Assess questions. [Web Photo]. Retrieved from http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/learningteaching/e-learning/usingservic/stuguide/tools-assessments.aspx

(n.d.). [Web Photo]. Retrieved from http://www.plagiarismchecker.net/plagiarism-checkers/plagiarism-checkers-do-they-help-students-cheat/

Fellenz, M. R. (2004). Using assessment to support higher level learning: the multiple choice item development assignment. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 26(6), 703-719.

LENCharlotte. (2009, Nov. 7). Howard Gardner of The Multiple Intelligence Theory. Retrieved April 25, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2QtSbP4FRg

Ormrod, J. E. (2003). Educational psychology, developing learners. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Overbaugh, R. C. (n.d.). Bloom's taxonomy. Retrieved from http://www.odu.edu/educ/roverbau/Bloom/blooms_taxonomy.htm

Perkins, D., & Blythe, T. (1994). Putting understanding up front. Educational Leadership, 51 (5), 4-7.

Rovai, A. P. (2000). Online and traditional assessments: what is the difference?. The Internet and Higher Education, 3, 141-151.

Stansberry, S. L., & Kymes, A. D. (2007). Transformative learning through "teaching with technology" electronic portfolios. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 50(6), 488-496.