Sarah Kirchberger

About This Course

Integrated Co-Teaching is very popular and is extremely helpful for students with disabilities in a classroom setting. However, many people are still unaware of what co-teaching is exactly. Did you know that there are many different methods of co-teaching and that the different teachers in the classroom play very different roles? This course is going to explain exactly what Integrated Co-Teaching is, the background of Co-Teaching, how to incorporate it into the classroom, what Universal Design for Learning is and how to create a successful co-teaching classroom in order to meet students individual needs.

About The Author

My name is Sarah Kirchberger and I am currently in my second semester of the CDIT program at UAlbany. have taught for the past 5 years in a school for children with an emotional disturbance. I have taught in a 6:1:1 and now I am currently in a 7th grade co-teaching classroom. I love being both the lead teacher and an Integrated Co-Teacher. I also enjoy teaching other staff members what Integrated Co-Teaching is and how to be successful using different models!

My Topic/Purpose

Integrated Co-Teaching (or ICT) is becoming much more utilized throughout classrooms. An Integrated Co-Teaching classroom has two teachers in each class in order for students to receive their individualized needs. ICT is a way for students with disabilities to receive support in a general education classroom with their peers. They are also exposed to the general education curriculum and will receive specially designed instruction to meet their individual needs.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course teachers will be able to:

-Identify the different roles between the general education teacher and the special education teacher.

-identify what integrated co-teaching is and what students receive these services.

-Identify different co-teaching models

Needs Assessment

1. Instructional Problem

The need for teachers, administrators or educational staff in general who may not have the experience or known methods of different integrated co-teaching strategies in order to meet the student's needs.

2. What is to be Learned

Participants will learn how to effectively use integrated co-teaching models. Participants will learn different models of co-teaching. Participants will learn how to create a lesson plan using a successful co-teaching model.


3. The Learners

Participants within this course include teachers who are not familiar with, do not have experience with, or going to be a part of an Integrated Co-Teaching classroom.


4. Context for Instruction

Participants of this mini-course will complete the components of this course online. The participants are asked to complete the activities at their own convenience while doing so before the set deadlines. Completion of the content will require only a computer and access to the Internet.


5. Exploring the Instructional Problem and Solution

The instructional problem is that teachers of general education and special education are asked to work together in a co-teaching classroom and one or both of the teachers are unaware of how that should look, or the responsibilities of each teacher, or just an effective method of integrated co-teaching. This is a problem because the students who are to receive the integrated co-teaching still have classroom and testing accommodations if the teachers are unaware how to correctly and successfully co-teach, the student with the modifications will lose out on learning.

There has been so much research on different co-teaching strategies. With that being said, not every co-teaching model is going to work within your classroom. Teachers are going to have to test different models and methods in order to see what one is the best fit for them and the students of their classroom. Due to the No Child Left Behind Act in 2001 the interest of incorporating co-teaching into classroom settings has increased. Also, providing students with the least restrictive environment has been another key factor in the interest of incorporating co-teaching strategies. Kohler and Evans, 2006 has described co-teaching a professional marriage because of the importance, as in strong personal partnerships, of building a strong and parity-based relationship.


Goals of this course

One goal of this course is to improve the teaching presence of instructors that are a part of an Integrated Co-Teaching classroom. Goals also include creating a lesson plan that states and explains three modifications using the Universal Design for learning, learners will identify responsibilities of each teacher in a Co-Teaching setting, identify three pro's and three con's of an Integrated Co-Teaching model.

Analysis of the learner and content

This mini-course is being created with different educators and administrators in mind. Participants will need access to a computer and connection to the internet. All participants will be presented with information about integrated co-teaching, different co-teaching models and the strengths and weaknesses of different co-teaching models.


Performance Objectives

Goals:

-identify 5 pros and 5 cons to the Integrated Co-Teaching model.

-given different scenarios, students will accurately identify 8/10 responsibilities of the Special Education teacher and the General Education teacher within an ICT classroom.

-create a lesson plan that states what integrated co-teaching model they will be using and 3 modifications using the Universal Design for learning.


Task Analysis

Elaborate and analyze the objectives to identify more specific enabling and supporting objectives.


Curriculum Map

Curriculum Map


Goals: -Identify 3 pros and 3 cons to the Integrated Co-Teaching model.

-Given different scenarios, students will accurately identify 8/10 responsibilities of the Special Education teacher and the General Education teacher within an ICT classroom.

-Create a lesson plan that states what integrated co-teaching model they will be using and 3 modifications using the Universal Design for learning.

Unit 1: What is Integrated Co-Teaching

Integrated Co-Teaching provides students with disabilities the chance to be included in a general education classroom and have access to the general education curriculum with the use of specially designed instruction to meet students individual needs.

Activity 1: Read the following articles that give an overview of what Integrated Co-Teaching is.

[1]

[2]

Activity 2: After you have read the articles please answer the following discussion questions within your Google Docs groups.

Discussion Questions:

1. What is Integrated Co-Teaching? 2. What are three strengths to integrated Co-Teaching 3. What are three cons to Integrated Co-Teaching

Activity 3: Once you have read BOTH articles please respond to the following questions:

-Explain in your own words what Integrated Co-Teaching looks like in a classroom.

-What are the roles of the Special Education Teacher and the General Education teacher

Unit 2: Models of Co Teaching

Activity 1: Please read the following descriptions for 6 different integrated co-teaching models. There are also examples of each model as well. You and the other teacher in the classroom are going to have to build a relationship and experiment which model is going to work best for the both of you. One Teach, One Observe: While one teacher leads the lesson, the co-teacher collects specific data about the students, the co-teacher or the environment. Station Teaching: Teachers divide content and students. Three groups of students rotate through three stations in which they work on non-hierarchical activities. Parallel Teaching: Two co-teachers teach the same content to separate groups simultaneously. Alternate Teaching: One teacher works with a large part of the class while the co-teacher works with a smaller group. One Teach, One Assist: one teacher leads instruction while the co-teacher circulates providing unobtrusive help as needed.

Activity 2: -Please read the following articles and watch the YouTube video on different Integrated Co-Teaching models and the roles of each teacher. https://www.schoolturnaroundsupport.org/sites/default/files/resources/Isherwood_2008_Factors.pdf https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10474410903535380 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBXxZBjWD4w

Activity 3: After you have read the article and watched the video:

-Compare and contrast two different models of Integrated Co-Teaching.

-Give three different roles of the Special Education teacher and three different roles for the General Education teacher.

Unit 3: Successful Integrated Co-Teaching Classroom

Activity 1: Integrated Co-Teaching settings can be extremely successful when done correctly. As stated earlier, it is very important that you build that relationship with the other teacher in the classroom and your students as well. There are many models that may be successful with one set of teachers and another model that might not be successful with another set.

Activity 2: Read the following articles and take note of what makes a successful Integrated classroom. https://sites.education.uky.edu/compass/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/walther-thomas_bryant__land_1996.pdf https://elementaryeducation.buffalostate.edu/sites/elementaryeducation.buffalostate.edu/files/uploads/Student%20Teaching/Co%20Teaching/Conderman.%20Middle%20School%20Co-Teaching%20Effective%20Practices%20and.pdf

Activity 3: You are going to revisit the six models of Integrated Co-Teaching and you are going to choose three models of Integrated Co-Teaching.


-Identify 3 positives and 3 negatives that you can see when using those three models.

Unit 4: Universal Design for Learning

Activity 1: When you are part of an Integrated Co-Teaching classroom it is important that the general education teacher that you work with and yourself have a positive, working relationship. Once you have that established it is now time for you to start looking through your students IEP’s and start tailoring the curriculum to your student's needs.

Activity 2: Read the following article and watch the YouTube video at the end

https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/for-educators/universal-design-for-learning/understanding-universal-design-for-learning

Activity 3: After watching the video and reading the articles provided:

- Identify 4 ways that UDL (Universal Design for Learning) is used in the classroom.

-Describe how UDL is different than differentiated instruction

Unit 5: Incorporating UDL into lesson plans

Activity 1: An overview of what we have learned in the previous models. There are many different models to an Integrated Co-Teaching classroom, however, it is up to you and the other teacher in the classroom to decide which model is going to work best for both of you. Integrated Co-Teaching allows for the least restrictive environment for students and allows students accommodations to be implemented to help these students be successful in the classroom. Accommodations can be a number of different tools that are used in the classroom. Extended test time, a limited number of questions, the use of a calculator and test administered in a separate location are all types of accommodations that can be listed on a student's IEP that partakes in an Integrated Classroom. When you are using UDL in the classroom it is important to remember UDL is the use of learning experiences made flexible to meet the needs of individual learners.

Activity 2: Watch the following videos and write down any Integrated Co-Teaching strategies or models that you see. https://vimeo.com/179764428 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21UeMPnO6-Y

Activity 3: Using a template of your choice, please create a 3 lesson unit that incorporates Co-Teaching strategies and appropriate modifications and accommodations using UDL.



References and Resources

Anderson, R.B., Isherwood, R.S. 2008. Factors Affecting the Adoption of Co-Teaching Models in Inclusive Classrooms, Vol. 2, 121-128.

Bryant, M., Land, S., Walther-Thomas, C. 1996. Planning for Effective Co-Teaching. The Key to Successful Inclusion, Vol. 17, 223-Cover 3

Kohler-Evans, P. A. 2006. Co-teaching: How to make this marriage work in front of the kids..Education, 127: 260–264.

Morin, A. 2014. Understanding Universal Design for Learning. Retrieved from: http://understood.org