Difference between revisions of "What is a MOO."

From KNILT
(script converts hard links to wiki links)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
FOLLOW THIS LINK TO RETURN TO [http://tccl.rit.albany.edu/knilt/index.php/What_is_a_MOO,_and_why_is_this_technology_relevent_to_a_twenty_first_century_student_of_literature%3F UNIT ONE]
+
FOLLOW THIS LINK TO RETURN TO [[What_is_a_MOO,_and_why_is_this_technology_relevent_to_a_twenty_first_century_student_of_literature%3F|UNIT ONE]]
  
  

Latest revision as of 14:49, 15 August 2019

FOLLOW THIS LINK TO RETURN TO UNIT ONE


A MOO or Multi User Object Oriented environment can be described as a virtual reality application.

Virtual reality can be defined as an "immersive and participitory world that is rendered digitally over the web."

There are other genres of video or virtual reality games, that have recently become well known such as Halo or World of WarCraft. They are categorized as MMORPG (Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game). Other games such as Second Life or There are categorized as MUVE (Multi-User Virtual Environment).

Although each of these acronyms can be described as virtual realities, the MOO is a unique environment that operates like a series of connected chat rooms. Each user has a login and password and communicates to other players by typing. The MOO environment has multiple interconnected rooms that players can explore and (in some cases) create. One side of the screen is used for chatting while the other side of the screen may contain graphics or video to help the user navigate the rooms or spaces within the environment, (81 Rozema).




By having students participate as players within a virtual world, they can assume the role of characters and explore the events related to a literary work. Browse THOUGHTCRIME, a MOO created by Robert Rozema to help students deeply engage with the events and characters of George Orwell's 1984.