Difference between revisions of "Using Video Games in the Math Classroom"

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== '''Overview and Purpose''' ==
 
== '''Overview and Purpose''' ==
 
[[File:Question_mark_heatherleo.png|frameless|right]]
 
[[File:Question_mark_heatherleo.png|frameless|right]]
''Have you ever wondered about using video games in the math classroom?''
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''Have you ever wondered about using video games in your math classroom?''
  
 
''Will video games increase your student’s achievement and motivation?''
 
''Will video games increase your student’s achievement and motivation?''
  
''Are there other reasons to incorporate video games in the math classroom?''
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''Are there other reasons to incorporate video games in your instruction?''
  
 
''How do you choose which game to use?''
 
''How do you choose which game to use?''
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The Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice describe practices that teachers should illicit in their students.  Students should be able to “model with mathematics” and solve problems from everyday life, society, and the workplace.  Student should also be able to “use appropriate tools strategically” including technological tools.  In addition, there is a shift in education to focus on 21st century skills.  21st century learning skills include authentic learning, real-world applications, and using technology.  With the need to incorporate the Common Core Standards, 21st century learning skills, and the 2008 Pew Internet and American Life Project survey results that 97% of teens play video games, it seems natural that video games should be incorporated in mathematics curriculum.
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The Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice describe practices that teachers should illicit in their students.  Students should be able to “model with mathematics” and solve problems from everyday life, society, and the workplace.  Student should also be able to “use appropriate tools strategically” including technological tools.  In addition, there is a shift in education to focus on 21st century skills.  21st century learning skills include authentic learning, real-world applications, and using technology.  With the need to incorporate the Common Core Standards, 21st century learning skills, and taking into account that 97% of teen play video games according to the 2008 Pew Internet and American Life Project survey results, it seems natural that video games should be incorporated in mathematics curriculum.
  
  
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[[Unit 1: Justify the Use of Video Games in the Math Classroom]]
 
[[Unit 1: Justify the Use of Video Games in the Math Classroom]]
  
This unit focuses on the benefits of using video games for math instruction.  The unit combines research, 21st century learning skills, and the Common Core Math Standards to highlight reasons for incorporating video games with math.
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''This unit focuses on the benefits of using video games for math instruction.  The unit combines research, 21st century learning skills, and the Common Core Math Standards to highlight reasons for incorporating video games with math.''
  
 
[[Unit 2: Identify Video Games in the Math Classroom]]
 
[[Unit 2: Identify Video Games in the Math Classroom]]
  
This unit focuses on the exploration of video games that can be used for math instruction.  Brainstorming is required!
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''This unit focuses on the exploration of video games that can be used for math instruction.  Brainstorming is required!''
  
 
[[Unit 3: Use Video Games in the Math Classrooom]]
 
[[Unit 3: Use Video Games in the Math Classrooom]]
  
This unit will inform teachers of a way to assess a video game for use in the classroom.  Teachers will also develop and share activities that incorporate video games.
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''This unit will inform teachers of a way to assess a video game for use in the classroom.  Teachers will also develop and share activities that incorporate video games.''
  
 
==Extended Resources==
 
==Extended Resources==
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Turkay, S., Hoffman, D., Kinzer, C. K., Chantes, P., Vicari, C. (2014). Toward understanding the potential of games for learning: Learning theory, game design characteristics, and situating video games in classrooms. Computers in the Schools, 31, 2-22.
 
Turkay, S., Hoffman, D., Kinzer, C. K., Chantes, P., Vicari, C. (2014). Toward understanding the potential of games for learning: Learning theory, game design characteristics, and situating video games in classrooms. Computers in the Schools, 31, 2-22.
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[[Category: Mathematics education]]
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[[Category: Games and simulations]]
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[[Category: Middle school]]
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[[Category: High school]]

Latest revision as of 16:53, 9 July 2020

ETAP 623 FALL 2015 - BYRNE section 5874 | Heather Leo Portfolio Page






Overview and Purpose

Question mark heatherleo.png

Have you ever wondered about using video games in your math classroom?

Will video games increase your student’s achievement and motivation?

Are there other reasons to incorporate video games in your instruction?

How do you choose which game to use?

Are there resources for teachers to use to help them incorporate video games?


These questions are the basis behind this mini-course: Using Video Games in the Math Classroom!


The Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice describe practices that teachers should illicit in their students. Students should be able to “model with mathematics” and solve problems from everyday life, society, and the workplace. Student should also be able to “use appropriate tools strategically” including technological tools. In addition, there is a shift in education to focus on 21st century skills. 21st century learning skills include authentic learning, real-world applications, and using technology. With the need to incorporate the Common Core Standards, 21st century learning skills, and taking into account that 97% of teen play video games according to the 2008 Pew Internet and American Life Project survey results, it seems natural that video games should be incorporated in mathematics curriculum.


Watch this video: https://www.ted.com/talks/gabe_zichermann_how_games_make_kids_smarter


So, if you are interested, then please proceed!

Course Prerequisites

· The participant will be secondary math teachers or working towards certification as a secondary math teacher.

· The participant will have access to a computer.

· The participant will have a web browser and will be familiar with using the web.

· The participant will be able to do a web search.

· The participant will be able to develop a lesson plan.

Performance Objectives

  1. Given a task and research articles, the participant will be able to justify the use of video games in the math classroom.
  2. By using a web search, the participant will be able to identify at least two video games used for math instruction.
  3. Using five considerations for educators when using video games (Turkey, Hoffman, Kinzer, Chantes, & Vicari, 2014, p. 15), the participant will be able to assess video games used for math instruction.
  4. The participant will create a classroom activity incorporating a video game by using the information learned in the course.

Course Units

This mini-course includes the following units. Click the title of a unit to go to its page.

Unit 1: Justify the Use of Video Games in the Math Classroom

This unit focuses on the benefits of using video games for math instruction. The unit combines research, 21st century learning skills, and the Common Core Math Standards to highlight reasons for incorporating video games with math.

Unit 2: Identify Video Games in the Math Classroom

This unit focuses on the exploration of video games that can be used for math instruction. Brainstorming is required!

Unit 3: Use Video Games in the Math Classrooom

This unit will inform teachers of a way to assess a video game for use in the classroom. Teachers will also develop and share activities that incorporate video games.

Extended Resources

National Governors Association Center for Best Practice, Council of Chief State School Officers. (2010). Common core state mathematics standards. Washington, DC: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/Math/Practice/

Pew Internet and American Life Project. (2008). Teens, Video Games and Civics. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/2008/09/16/teens-video-games-and-civics/

Turkay, S., Hoffman, D., Kinzer, C. K., Chantes, P., Vicari, C. (2014). Toward understanding the potential of games for learning: Learning theory, game design characteristics, and situating video games in classrooms. Computers in the Schools, 31, 2-22.