Universal Design for Learning

Revision as of 17:08, 27 July 2020 by Gjj (talk | contribs)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Photo by @chrissiebutler CORE Education CC BY NC 4.0

Overview and Purpose

This course will be used for K-12 educators seeking to accommodate all leaners through universal design for learning. Novices will develop their knowledge and craft by studying research, viewing classrooms using UDL guidelines and observing learners to target specific needs. By the end of this course, educators will be creating their own lesson using multiple means of representation, expression and engagement to make content accessible for all students.

Participants of this course will learn fully online. Participation is self-guided, adding to discussions and participating in activities as you go. Options will be provided to go out into the field to document student needs, however, a video will be provided for those who would prefer to participate fully online. Participation requires a computer and Internet connection. Educators can use this mini-course to independently supplement their instructional knowledge of universal design. It can also be used by a group of educators to complete together, participating in discussions and collaborative events communally.

Needs Assessment

After completing a needs assessment, my research indicated a significant need by educators to understand universal design. The overall results of a survey strongly represent a need for learning the principles of UDL as well as how to apply it in classrooms. When asked, “What is universal design for learning?” the frequently response was “Not sure”. When asked if they were familiar with the Universal Design for Learning Guidelines, 85% of participants responded “No”. When asked if they were familiar with the three networks of the brain, 100% of participants responded “No”. When asked how to use UDL in their classroom, the most frequent response was “I don’t know”. When asked how teachers assess student needs, the most frequent responses were formative and summative assessments and classroom observations. When asked what strategies they use to collect student need data, they answered: collaborate with service providers, observational checklists, formative and summative assessments and contact parents. When asked what accommodations and modifications are used for student needs, teachers responded with “modifying how students practice a certain skill” and “use visual supports”. When asked whom to seek for assistance with these things, teachers appropriately responded with our assistive technologist and our special education teachers. When asked if they were comfortable applying UDL in their classroom currently, participants demonstrated they were uncomfortable. This data supports the targeted objectives for this mini-course.

Performance Objectives

  • Learners will demonstrate understanding of Universal Design for Learning Guidelines by watching a video and reading research to interact with their peers in a discussion regarding means of representation, expression and engagement.
  • Learners will understand the three brain networks (the why, the what and the how) of learning by completing a comprehension check.
  • Learners will compare and contrast the three brain networks (the why, the what and the how) of learning by selecting learning opportunities to cater to all learners through a provided classroom scenario.
  • Participants will define examples of learning barriers and will provide examples of how to achieve UDL in their classroom by eliminating these barriers.
  • Using the learner analysis process and a provided observation form, learners will understand learner characteristics to observe a cohort of students to identify group and individual learner needs.
  • Using collaborative discussion, learners will share their observations and findings with their peers and provide suggestions based on UDL guidelines.
  • Using research, educators will identify the key elements of a universally designed lesson plan.
  • Using provided examples as a reference, learners will create a lesson plan that includes multiple means of representation, expression and engagement.
  • Students will share their prepared lesson plan and provide feedback to their peers by using a rubric to evaluate lesson plans.
  • Students will respond to a self-reflective prompt about applying UDL guidelines in their classroom.

Course Units

This mini-course includes the following units. Click the title of a unit to go to its page.

Unit 1: What is Universal Design for Learning?

  • Learners will demonstrate understanding of Universal Design for Learning Guidelines by watching a video and reading research to interact with their peers in a discussion regarding means of representation, expression and engagement.
  • Learners will understand the three brain networks (the why, the what and the how) of learning by completing a comprehension check.
  • Learners will compare and contrast the three brain networks (the why, the what and the how) of learning by selecting learning opportunities to cater to all learners through a provided classroom scenario.

Unit 2: How Can Educators Incorporate Universal Design for Learning?

  • Participants will define examples of learning barriers and will provide examples of how to achieve UDL in their classroom by eliminating these barriers.
  • Using the learner analysis process and a provided observation form, learners will understand learner characteristics to observe a cohort of students to identify group and individual learner needs.
  • Using collaborative discussion, learners will share their observations and findings with their peers and provide suggestions based on UDL guidelines.

Unit 3: Creating Your Universally Designed Classroom

  • Using research, educators will identify the key elements of a universally designed lesson plan.
  • Using provided examples as a reference, learners will create a lesson plan that includes multiple means of representation, expression and engagement.
  • Students will share their prepared lesson plan and provide feedback to their peers by using a rubric to evaluate lesson plans.
  • Students will respond to a self-reflective prompt about applying UDL guidelines in their classroom.