Unit Three: What are the demands of questioning on the student and the teacher?

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Purplearrowbullet.gifLearning Objectives

The learner will know the ways in which questioning can be used by teacher and the students and see how questioning overlaps as well as differs in the way it is used by the teacher and the student.

Bluearrowbullet.gifMini-Lecture

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It is very important for teachers to use questions in the classroom and encourage students to question what they are learning as well. Often times teachers have more control over what questions are being asked, instead of the students. Through the articles below we will explore the ways in which teachers use questions to stimulate higher order thinking, as well as how students can actively participate and learn through their own questions. In a classroom it is important to understand that everyone has different ideas and ways of thinking, so when questions are shared among students and the teacher more learning will be able to take place. Apart, we each have separate ideas, however, when ideas are shared and questions are asked the pieces of learning begin to fit together and higher level thinking can then occur!

The following articles demonstrate how teachers can encourage students to ask questions of their own, as well as how teachers can use questioning strategies with students in the classroom to improve the learning process: (When reading through the articles in both sections consider how the questions used by the teachers and the students, are both similar and different.)

The following articles demonstrate the importance of allowing students to ask questions instead of always being the ones to answer the questions given by the teacher. The articles also show examples of different questions that students may choose to use as a guide to their own learning:

(After carefully reviewing and taking notes on each of the articles, use the information to complete the following unit activity)

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It is important to know the ways in which questioning can be used by teacher and the students and see how questioning overlaps, as well as differs in the way it is used by the teacher and the student. Using the articles provided above complete the Student vs. Teacher Questioning Venn Diagram. The left side of the diagram should be labeled student, and the right side of the diagram should be labeled teacher. On each of these sides include at east five ways or benefits of either the student or the teacher using questioning in the classroom effectively. The similarities of questioning styles between students and teachers should be recorded in the middle section where the two circles overlap.

Once the diagram is completed consider the following questions:

  • What are the demands of questioning on the learner?
  • What are the demands of questioning on the teacher?
  • As a professional in the field of education, how do you feel about using questioning in the classroom?
  • How can we put more control in the hands of our students in regards to questioning?

Using your completed Venn diagram, answer at least two of the questions above or come up with two of your own questions and/or ideas on a blank word document. Give a detailed explanation about what you think, in regards to the demands of questioning on the teacher and on the student.

Yellowarrowbullet.gifConclusion

The Venn Diagram and written reflection in this unit allow us to have a more clear understanding of the demands of questioning on the teacher and students. As you can see, there are different demands depending on the given situation, but there are also many similarities with the demands of effective questioning with both the teacher and students.

Arrowbullet.pngClick here to proceed to Unit 4 Unit_Four:_Are_effective_questioning_strategies_being_properly_implemented_in_the_classroom_on_a_regular_basis?

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