Difference between revisions of "Unit One: Scientific Literacy"

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Return to:  
<u>Go to</u>: [[ETAP 623 Spring 2020 (Zhang)]] | [[Brian Desrochers|Brian's Profile Page]]
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<u>Go to</u>: [[ETAP 623 Spring 2020 (Zhang)]] | [[Brian Desrochers|Brian's Profile Page]] | [[Unit 2: Helping Students Interpret Data Intensive Media]]
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[[File:Pie chart.jpg|350px|thumb|right|Pie Graph on Energy Sources ]]
  
  
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==Do Now==
 
==Do Now==
Part 1
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* Using your current knowledge of science, come up with a definition of what you believe it means to be scientifically literate. Think about what  it means to:  
 
* Using your current knowledge of science, come up with a definition of what you believe it means to be scientifically literate. Think about what  it means to:  
 
# Understand Science
 
# Understand Science
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# Communicate in Science
 
# Communicate in Science
 
# Share ideas in science
 
# Share ideas in science
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* Watch the following YouTube video and revisit your definition of scientific literacy. After watching the video, re-write your definition of scientific literacy and write down any questions you may have. Write your initial ideas for how data intensive documents play a role in scientific literacy. 
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<html5media height="360" width="640”>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-EsmVbIjLU</html5media>
  
Part 2
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Write your definition to science literacy after viewing the materials here https://padlet.com/desrob91/sblv2afgpexf93vx
* Watch the following YouTube video and revisit your definition of scientific literacy. After watching the video, re-write your definition of scientific literacy and write down any questions you may have. Write your initial ideas for how data intensive documents play a role in scientific literacy. 
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-EsmVbIjLU
 
  
 
==Mini-Lecture==
 
==Mini-Lecture==
"In 1956, Benjamin Bloom with collaborators Max Englehart, Edward Furst, Walter Hill, and David Krathwohl published a framework for categorizing educational goals: Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Familiarly known as Bloom’s Taxonomy, this framework has been applied by generations of K-12 teachers and college instructors in their teaching.
 
  
The framework elaborated by Bloom and his collaborators consisted of six major categories: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation. The categories after Knowledge were presented as “skills and abilities,” with the understanding that knowledge was the necessary precondition for putting these skills and abilities into practice.
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Read the following article that addresses science literacy and the importance of connecting to students' lives, by Noah Feinstein.
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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/sce.20414
  
While each category contained subcategories, all lying along a continuum from simple to complex and concrete to abstract, the taxonomy is popularly remembered according to the six main categories."(Armstrong, 2020)
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The reading focused on how science literacy cannot be fully achieved until that knowledge is transferred to making meaningful decisions in society. "Research from both science education and public engagement tells us that people selectively integrate scientific ideas with other sources of meaning, connecting those ideas with their lived experience to draw conclusions
 +
and make decisions that are personally and socially meaningful" (Feinstein, 2010, p. 180). If this is true then teaching our students to become scientifically literate becomes an important task. People need to have a sound scientific knowledge base if they are going to make informed decisions that guide the future of our country. There is also research that suggests that there is a difference between literacy in science and being scientifically literate.
 +
Read through the following website and watch the video embedded in it:
 +
https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/english/literacy/Pages/introduction_to_literacy_in_science.aspx
  
[[File:Bloom Quote.jpg|thumb|right|Source-https://www.azquotes.com/author/31395-Benjamin_Bloom]]
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The website and video stated that being able to read and write in scientific ways is literacy in science. The ability to understand how complex systems and phenomena work in science is being scientifically literate. This is an important distinction to make because each discipline has its own specific skills and knowledge that make a person literate in that discipline. The diagram below summarizes their findings and shows the difference between the two types of literacies. 
 +
[[File:Circular diagram.jpg|400px|thumb|center|Literacy in Science vs. Scientific Literacy ]]
  
Bloom's Taxonomy is made up of seven major components Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation and Creation each of which has an important role in the social studies curriculum. In order to broaden our understanding as well as focus our learning we will focus on each part in an individual way and build up to our end of module assignment.
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==Work Period==
* Knowledge "involves the recall of specifics and universals, the recall of methods and processes, or the recall of a pattern, structure, or setting.” (Armstrong, 2020)
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After reading and viewing the previous content, think about and answer the following questions:
* Comprehension "“refers to a type of understanding or apprehension such that the individual knows what is being communicated and can make use of the material or idea being communicated without necessarily relating it to other material or seeing its fullest implications.” (Armstrong, 2020)
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# How has your definition of Science Literacy evolved throughout this unit?
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# What is your revised definition of science Literacy after viewing the material?
 +
# Predict, how does data intensive media plays a role in scientific literacy?
 +
Write your thoughts to the questions using this link https://padlet.com/desrob91/sblv2afgpexf93vx
  
These two components are viewed as the lowest rungs of Bloom's Taxonomy from a cognitive perspective, as one who has mastered these levels can typically only recall learned information on command and summarize material. These are important skills to master when learning material, but as we move forward it will become clear that we must strive to push our assessment tools far beyond knowledge and comprehension based assignments. Though these are often the easiest types of assessments to create we often learn very little about our students ability and does little to engage long-term learning aspirations.
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==Summary/Conclusion==
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Hopefully you now have a better understanding on what it means to be literate in science. The research and readings tell us that science literacy is being able to understand complex science systems and phenomena, and apply them in ways that are beneficial to our everyday lives. Hopefully you are starting to generate ideas on how data intensive media fits into this description. The following unit will focus on how we can select appropriate media, and the best practices for helping students interpret this media.
  
To conclude this mini-lecture read the following article and reflect how these changes and the lack of commitment as some may say to social studies may impact your teaching strategies. Think about ways you can engage other subjects into the teaching of social studies as well, along with ways to make your students experience less about knowledge and comprehension and more about the higher levels of Bloom's.
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==References==
* https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/summer-2019/what-changed-in-social-studies-education
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Feinstein, N. (2010). Salvaging Science Literacy. Science Education, p. 168-185. Retrieved from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/sce.20414
 
 
==Learning Activities==
 
Part 1 → https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqzkCFL3ZUY
 
* Watch this YouTube Video which applies Blooms Taxonomy to the popular TV show Friends and write down when you see effective and ineffective learning strategies.  
 
 
 
Part 2
 
[[File:Blank-map-of-the-united-states.jpg|frame|center|Source-https://printable-maps.blogspot.com/2011/12/blank-map-of-united-states.html]]
 
* Task- Label each state on the map.
 
* Task- Estimate the 10 largest states by population, and explain why you believe their population is so high.
 
 
 
==Ticket out the Door==
 
  
MY QUESTION
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Victoria State Government. (2019).  Introduction to Science Literacy. Retrieved from: https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/english/literacy/Pages/introduction_to_literacy_in_science.aspx
* During your learning activities for this unit you watched another video that demonstrated the different rungs of Blooms Taxonomy, as well as worked with some common geography questions. ''Can you determine a students ability from those two geography activities, what students may struggle with those types of questions? In what ways could you take those same questions based around the map and make them into higher-level questions for your students?
 
''
 
  
==References==
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Zwicker, A. (2015). Scientific Literacy is Necessary. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-EsmVbIjLU

Latest revision as of 13:47, 10 May 2020

Return to: Go to: ETAP 623 Spring 2020 (Zhang) | Brian's Profile Page | Unit 2: Helping Students Interpret Data Intensive Media

Pie Graph on Energy Sources


Learning Objectives

  1. Learners will be asked to create their own definition of scientific literacy.
  2. Learners will predict how data intensive documents compliment scientific literacy

Do Now

  • Using your current knowledge of science, come up with a definition of what you believe it means to be scientifically literate. Think about what it means to:
  1. Understand Science
  2. "Do Science"
  3. Communicate in Science
  4. Share ideas in science
  • Watch the following YouTube video and revisit your definition of scientific literacy. After watching the video, re-write your definition of scientific literacy and write down any questions you may have. Write your initial ideas for how data intensive documents play a role in scientific literacy.

Write your definition to science literacy after viewing the materials here https://padlet.com/desrob91/sblv2afgpexf93vx

Mini-Lecture

Read the following article that addresses science literacy and the importance of connecting to students' lives, by Noah Feinstein. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/sce.20414

The reading focused on how science literacy cannot be fully achieved until that knowledge is transferred to making meaningful decisions in society. "Research from both science education and public engagement tells us that people selectively integrate scientific ideas with other sources of meaning, connecting those ideas with their lived experience to draw conclusions and make decisions that are personally and socially meaningful" (Feinstein, 2010, p. 180). If this is true then teaching our students to become scientifically literate becomes an important task. People need to have a sound scientific knowledge base if they are going to make informed decisions that guide the future of our country. There is also research that suggests that there is a difference between literacy in science and being scientifically literate. Read through the following website and watch the video embedded in it: https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/english/literacy/Pages/introduction_to_literacy_in_science.aspx

The website and video stated that being able to read and write in scientific ways is literacy in science. The ability to understand how complex systems and phenomena work in science is being scientifically literate. This is an important distinction to make because each discipline has its own specific skills and knowledge that make a person literate in that discipline. The diagram below summarizes their findings and shows the difference between the two types of literacies.

Literacy in Science vs. Scientific Literacy

Work Period

After reading and viewing the previous content, think about and answer the following questions:

  1. How has your definition of Science Literacy evolved throughout this unit?
  2. What is your revised definition of science Literacy after viewing the material?
  3. Predict, how does data intensive media plays a role in scientific literacy?

Write your thoughts to the questions using this link https://padlet.com/desrob91/sblv2afgpexf93vx

Summary/Conclusion

Hopefully you now have a better understanding on what it means to be literate in science. The research and readings tell us that science literacy is being able to understand complex science systems and phenomena, and apply them in ways that are beneficial to our everyday lives. Hopefully you are starting to generate ideas on how data intensive media fits into this description. The following unit will focus on how we can select appropriate media, and the best practices for helping students interpret this media.

References

Feinstein, N. (2010). Salvaging Science Literacy. Science Education, p. 168-185. Retrieved from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/sce.20414

Victoria State Government. (2019). Introduction to Science Literacy. Retrieved from: https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/english/literacy/Pages/introduction_to_literacy_in_science.aspx

Zwicker, A. (2015). Scientific Literacy is Necessary. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-EsmVbIjLU