Unit 5 Wrap up and Evaluation

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Science Inquiry

Unit 1 Introduction

Unit 2 How to Implement Inquiry in Science Teaching

Unit 3 Curriculum Design Principles for Science Inquiry

Unit 4 Inquiry in Project-based Science classrooms

Unit 5

Science3.jpg





Learning Objectives of this unit

By the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Review and reflect what you have learned in this course;
  • Evaluate and make suggestions to the designer of this course;
  • Choose to put the new knowledge and skills you have learned in this course into use;
  • Choose to advocate the inquiry-based science teaching method in discussions with more people.

Wrap-Up

This wiki course has introduced the educational concept of Inquiry-based Science Instruction, and the principles of design curriculum matericals for meeting the needs of Inqury-based Science Instruction. It has also demonstrated how a project can be designed and applied to meet all the principles.

Key points of this course include:

  • Concept of Inquiry in Science Teaching
  • Five Characterestics of the inquiry processThree types of Inquiry
  • Apporaches to Inquiry-based Instruction
  • Seven curriculum design principles
  • Five aspects of Inquiry Project

Evaluation

This section is not an evaluation or assessment for your study and understanding on Science Inquriy, but rather an evaluation of this wiki to determine if it was successful in its objectives.

Please use the spaces in the "comment" to add your evaluation and thoughts about the various aspects of this course. Please focus on these questions:

  • Do you think this course is useful to you? If yes, what parts are useful?
  • Which units were the most effective?
  • Which activities were the most helpful to you personally?
  • What might be changed to improve this course?

Thanks a lot for your effort.

Acknowledgements & Thanks

I would like to present my thanks to:

  • Professor Jianwei Zhang, for leading me into the new realms of the education and providing me new lengths of seeing this world.
  • My classmates in ETAP 623 in SUNY at Albany, your surpport and encouragements always help me to keep going forward with confidence.

References

American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1993) Benchmarks for Science Literacy. New York, Oxford University Press*.*
Enacting Project-Based Science Ronald W. Marx, Phyllis C. Blumenfeld, Joseph S. Krajcik, Elliot Soloway The Elementary School Journal, Vol. 97, No. 4, Special Issue: Science (Mar., 1997), pp. 341-358

Impacts of Participation in a GK-12 Fellowship Program on Teachers' Conceptions and Use of Inquiry Science
Leanne Avery, Nancy Trautmann, and Marianne Krasny, Cornell University
Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Philadelphia, PA, March 22-26, 2003

An Inquiry Primer by Alan Coburn, Science Scope, March 2000, National Science Teachers Association

Inquiry in Project-Based Science Classrooms: Initial Attempts by Middle School Student Joseph Krajcik; Phyllis C. Blumenfeld; Ronald W. Marx; Kristin M. Bass; Jennifer Fredricks; Elliot Solowal The Journal of the Learning Sciences, Vol. 7, No. 3/4, Learning through Problem Solving. (1998), pp. 313-350.

Constructing extended inquiry projects: Curriculum materials for science education reform. Educational Psychologist,Singer, J., Marx, R. W., Krajcik, J., & Chambers, C. J. (2000). Constructing extended inquiry projects: Curriculum materials for science education reform. Educational Psychologist, 35(3), 165-178.

National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment. (1992). National science education standards: A sampler. Washington, DC: National Research Council.

Why minimal guidance during instruction does not work: an analysis of the failure of constructivist, discovery, problem-based, experiential, and inquiry-based teaching. Kirschner, P. A., Sweller, J., and Clark, R. E. (2006). "Why minimal guidance during instruction does not work: an analysis of the failure of constructivist, discovery, problem-based, experiential, and inquiry-based teaching". Educational Psychologist 41 (2): 75-86.