Difference between revisions of "Unit 1: The Importance of Creative Writing: What is World-Building?"

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<big>'''Unit 1: The Importance of Creative Writing: What is World-Building?'''</big>
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Unit 1: The Importance of Creative Writing: What is World-Building?
 
   
 
   
Lesson 1: Creative Writing and Teacher Education - Why creative writing is important and the gap in creative writing pedagogy
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Overview:  
 
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Welcome to the course “Creative Writing in the Modern Classroom”! During this course, you will be investigating the importance of creative writing, how to use “world-building” elements to engage students and enrich your lesson plans, and will finish up the course with a final project of editing or creating a lesson plan with creative writing and “world-building” elements.
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During this Unit we’re going to create an informal journal of resources and ideas. Follow this link (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rMJu9v-lVu188Z0fNblJcd_YbIgRR9HiKo4xJhCic98/edit?usp=sharing) to go to a Google Doc outline that has been created with prompts and questions to help guide your thoughts as we progress through the first unit of the mini-course. At the top of the page, add this file to your Google Drive, and after navigating back to Google Drive, right click the file and make a copy for yourself to edit. This will allow you to change headings, add in your own information, and copy and paste links for future reference in a way that will not affect the work of others.
 
Objective: Participants will recognize how adding world building elements to a lesson  
 
Objective: Participants will recognize how adding world building elements to a lesson  
 
plan adds depth and texture to a normal creative writing lesson by reading online sources  
 
plan adds depth and texture to a normal creative writing lesson by reading online sources  
 
found by the course administrator.
 
found by the course administrator.
 
+
 
+
Lesson 1: Creative Writing and Teacher Education - Why creative writing is important and the gap in creative writing pedagogy
Overview:  
+
Welcome to the course “Creative Writing in the Modern Classroom”! During this course, you will be investigating the importance of creative writing, how to use “world-building” elements to engage students and enrich your lesson plans, and will finish up the course with a final project of editing or creating a lesson plan with creative writing and “world-building” elements.
+
Project 1:
During this Unit we’re going to create an informal journal of resources and ideas. Follow [https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rMJu9v-lVu188Z0fNblJcd_YbIgRR9HiKo4xJhCic98/edit?usp=sharing this link] to go to a Google Doc outline that has been created with prompts and questions to help guide your thoughts as we progress through the first unit of the mini-course. At the top of the page, add this file to your Google Drive, and after navigating back to Google Drive, right click the file and make a copy for yourself to edit. This will allow you to change headings, add in your own information, and copy and paste links for future reference in a way that will not affect the work of others.
 
 
 
 
 
Project 1:
 
 
 
 
Let’s do some research on why creative writing is important. Watch the following TedTalk by Anthony Lishak, an author and a host of over 2000 creative writing workshops in schools.  
 
Let’s do some research on why creative writing is important. Watch the following TedTalk by Anthony Lishak, an author and a host of over 2000 creative writing workshops in schools.  
 
https://youtu.be/nwjxDtVeibk?t=181  
 
https://youtu.be/nwjxDtVeibk?t=181  
 
Watch this video through fully, then go into your Unit 1 Journal and log your ideas about what this prominent writer has to say on creative writing and the importance of it in modern education.  
 
Watch this video through fully, then go into your Unit 1 Journal and log your ideas about what this prominent writer has to say on creative writing and the importance of it in modern education.  
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Project 2:
Project 2:
 
 
 
 
If your interest piqued while you were listening to Lishak, you are taking the right course. In order to highlight the barriers you face when it comes to including creative writing in your curriculum, go into your Unit 1 Journal and make a list of the things that stop you from introducing creative writing.
 
If your interest piqued while you were listening to Lishak, you are taking the right course. In order to highlight the barriers you face when it comes to including creative writing in your curriculum, go into your Unit 1 Journal and make a list of the things that stop you from introducing creative writing.
 
 
Is your list short? Is it long? Does it include not feeling supported by your district, or by the state-mandated curriculum? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you’re not alone. Over 25 teachers were surveyed in the creation of this mini-course and all had responses that echoed yours. If creative writing is important, why are the gaps in modern pedagogy?
 
Is your list short? Is it long? Does it include not feeling supported by your district, or by the state-mandated curriculum? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you’re not alone. Over 25 teachers were surveyed in the creation of this mini-course and all had responses that echoed yours. If creative writing is important, why are the gaps in modern pedagogy?
 
 
As Sir Ken Robinson says in his TedTalk “Do schools kill creativity?” (https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_changing_education_paradigms/up-next) that now has over 57 million views, our education system was created in a time when America needed factory workers. This system hasn’t truly changed since then. All the students that came out of primary education needed to be able to think and act and create in roughly the same way. Modern pedagogy is slowly making way for the 21st century skills students now need that ask them to create, elaborate, and synthesize.  
 
As Sir Ken Robinson says in his TedTalk “Do schools kill creativity?” (https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_changing_education_paradigms/up-next) that now has over 57 million views, our education system was created in a time when America needed factory workers. This system hasn’t truly changed since then. All the students that came out of primary education needed to be able to think and act and create in roughly the same way. Modern pedagogy is slowly making way for the 21st century skills students now need that ask them to create, elaborate, and synthesize.  
 
   
 
   
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Lesson 2: Student Engagement and Its Importance  - The importance of student engagement and how to help students become engaged
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Project 1:
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As educators, we can attest that when students are engaged they tend to learn material and understand concepts better. For this first project, we will examine the importance of student engagement and peruse through some resources for increasing it in your classroom. Read page 99 in (https://books.google.com/books?id=7LSxRvDF-RgC&lpg=PA96&ots=3MgoTz3VLn&dq=Student%20Engagement%3A%20What%20Is%20It%3F%20Why%20Does%20It%20Matter%3F%20Jeremy%20D.%20Finn%20and%20Kayla%20S.%20Zimmer&pg=PA98#v=onepage&q=Student%20Engagement:%20What%20Is%20It?%20Why%20Does%20It%20Matter?%20Jeremy%20D.%20Finn%20and%20Kayla%20S.%20Zimmer&f=false) the Handbook of Research on Student Engagement to see “why engagement matters.” After this, using guiding questions of engagement created by Dr. Robert J. Mazano (https://www.marzanoresearch.com/resources/tips/hec_tips_archive#tip20) fill out the reflective table in your journal about how you succeed in thinking about the guiding question in your room, and how you could “grow” or the areas where you neglect these guiding questions. Feel free to use bullet points to loosely jot down your thoughts.
 
   
 
   
 
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Project 2:
Lesson 2: Student Engagement and “World-Building” - The importance of student engagement and how world-building elements help students become engaged
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After noting subject/curriculum areas where you struggle to increase student engagement, we will now look over some student engagement resources. Take time to look through this (https://www.edutopia.org/student-engagement-resources ) masterlist of student engagement activities and tips, and list a few (3-5) that spark your interest, or that you think a colleague could use. In your journal, create a list of the strategies/activities/tips either in digital form such as a bulleted list in the journal itself, or in physical form through the use of the printable minibook.
 
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
Lesson 3: The Importance of “Believable Worlds” - What is “world-building” and the importance of “believable worlds”
 
Lesson 3: The Importance of “Believable Worlds” - What is “world-building” and the importance of “believable worlds”
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Project 1:
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What is “world-building” in creative writing? This broad umbrella term has been used through decades of creative writers’ work and has even permeated into video game design, film production, and tabletop RPG (roleplay games).

Revision as of 14:38, 19 April 2019

Unit 1: The Importance of Creative Writing: What is World-Building?

Overview: Welcome to the course “Creative Writing in the Modern Classroom”! During this course, you will be investigating the importance of creative writing, how to use “world-building” elements to engage students and enrich your lesson plans, and will finish up the course with a final project of editing or creating a lesson plan with creative writing and “world-building” elements. During this Unit we’re going to create an informal journal of resources and ideas. Follow this link (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rMJu9v-lVu188Z0fNblJcd_YbIgRR9HiKo4xJhCic98/edit?usp=sharing) to go to a Google Doc outline that has been created with prompts and questions to help guide your thoughts as we progress through the first unit of the mini-course. At the top of the page, add this file to your Google Drive, and after navigating back to Google Drive, right click the file and make a copy for yourself to edit. This will allow you to change headings, add in your own information, and copy and paste links for future reference in a way that will not affect the work of others. Objective: Participants will recognize how adding world building elements to a lesson plan adds depth and texture to a normal creative writing lesson by reading online sources found by the course administrator.

Lesson 1: Creative Writing and Teacher Education - Why creative writing is important and the gap in creative writing pedagogy

Project 1: Let’s do some research on why creative writing is important. Watch the following TedTalk by Anthony Lishak, an author and a host of over 2000 creative writing workshops in schools. https://youtu.be/nwjxDtVeibk?t=181 Watch this video through fully, then go into your Unit 1 Journal and log your ideas about what this prominent writer has to say on creative writing and the importance of it in modern education. Project 2: If your interest piqued while you were listening to Lishak, you are taking the right course. In order to highlight the barriers you face when it comes to including creative writing in your curriculum, go into your Unit 1 Journal and make a list of the things that stop you from introducing creative writing. Is your list short? Is it long? Does it include not feeling supported by your district, or by the state-mandated curriculum? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you’re not alone. Over 25 teachers were surveyed in the creation of this mini-course and all had responses that echoed yours. If creative writing is important, why are the gaps in modern pedagogy? As Sir Ken Robinson says in his TedTalk “Do schools kill creativity?” (https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_changing_education_paradigms/up-next) that now has over 57 million views, our education system was created in a time when America needed factory workers. This system hasn’t truly changed since then. All the students that came out of primary education needed to be able to think and act and create in roughly the same way. Modern pedagogy is slowly making way for the 21st century skills students now need that ask them to create, elaborate, and synthesize.

Lesson 2: Student Engagement and Its Importance - The importance of student engagement and how to help students become engaged Project 1: As educators, we can attest that when students are engaged they tend to learn material and understand concepts better. For this first project, we will examine the importance of student engagement and peruse through some resources for increasing it in your classroom. Read page 99 in (https://books.google.com/books?id=7LSxRvDF-RgC&lpg=PA96&ots=3MgoTz3VLn&dq=Student%20Engagement%3A%20What%20Is%20It%3F%20Why%20Does%20It%20Matter%3F%20Jeremy%20D.%20Finn%20and%20Kayla%20S.%20Zimmer&pg=PA98#v=onepage&q=Student%20Engagement:%20What%20Is%20It?%20Why%20Does%20It%20Matter?%20Jeremy%20D.%20Finn%20and%20Kayla%20S.%20Zimmer&f=false) the Handbook of Research on Student Engagement to see “why engagement matters.” After this, using guiding questions of engagement created by Dr. Robert J. Mazano (https://www.marzanoresearch.com/resources/tips/hec_tips_archive#tip20) fill out the reflective table in your journal about how you succeed in thinking about the guiding question in your room, and how you could “grow” or the areas where you neglect these guiding questions. Feel free to use bullet points to loosely jot down your thoughts.

Project 2: After noting subject/curriculum areas where you struggle to increase student engagement, we will now look over some student engagement resources. Take time to look through this (https://www.edutopia.org/student-engagement-resources ) masterlist of student engagement activities and tips, and list a few (3-5) that spark your interest, or that you think a colleague could use. In your journal, create a list of the strategies/activities/tips either in digital form such as a bulleted list in the journal itself, or in physical form through the use of the printable minibook.

Lesson 3: The Importance of “Believable Worlds” - What is “world-building” and the importance of “believable worlds” Project 1: What is “world-building” in creative writing? This broad umbrella term has been used through decades of creative writers’ work and has even permeated into video game design, film production, and tabletop RPG (roleplay games).