Talk:Slavery Unit

Revision as of 13:59, 6 May 2010 by Sarah Graham (talk | contribs) (Ease of movement -- ~~~~: new section)
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Instructor comment on your lessons -- Jz833665 14:09, 30 April 2010 (EDT)

This is a very well designed and informative lesson. Nice work.

  • As you're reporting an instructional design case, you may include in the introduction section a part (summary) to teachers who want to understand your context and pedagogical rationale and may even adopt/adapt your lesson designs, and include a link to your portfolio page there for further details.


  • At the bottom of each lesson, you may include a link to the next lesson so that user does not always need to go back to your homepage.
  • You use a final project in your last lesson. I'm wondering if it is workable for you to present this project task in the beginning of your module, so that the students will be working towards an authentic goal as they find, analyze, and investigate the various sources.
  • Objectives like the following one can better elaborated. Please check others too.
By the end of this course you will be able 
   * Gain a deeper knowledge of slavery in America.
  • Lesson 2: Audacity Assessment: I'm curious why you ask students to record an audio instead of write down their analysis.
Directions: pick one of the documents that you did a primary source analysis on. Using your document sheet and audacity, record an audio file

Re: Instructor comment on your lessons -- Frank Engle 12:36, 5 May 2010 (EDT)

Professor Zhang, I like to include audio or speaking projects in my lessons due to my students' weakness in written expression. Many of my students, almost 1/3rd have written expression levels two years below grade level. Because of this it is often difficult to determine if they truly do not understand something or simply do not know how to demonstrate what they know through the written word. Conversely, Most of my students' verbal/linguistic skills are at grade level. Because they are strong in this area, I try to give them opportunities to vocalize what they know about once a unit.

As for your other comments I have already begun implementing some of your suggestions and hope to be complete with them by the end of today.

Thank you for your help. Frank

Ease of movement -- Sarah Graham 13:59, 6 May 2010 (EDT)

I really enjoy how easy it is to follow through your lessons. I also enjoy all the different styles of learning that you met. Your objectives all were very clear and I would definetly share these with the students before starting your lessons. YOur images really caught my attention and made it easy to stay involved. My only suggestion may be to include time lenghts. I could estimate as a teacher how long each lesson would take though if you already know it would be good to have a general idea. I have not read anything about slavery in amny years and must admit I learned a few new facts reading through your lessons. Nice Job!