Positive Discipline in the Classroom

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ETAP 623 Spring 2015 by Dr. Zhang | About Cheryl DePra | Cheryl DePra's Design Portfolio

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Intent of Project

The intent of this course is to equip educators with the classroom management tools of Positive Discipline. While the Positive Discipline in the Classroom mini-course will focus on early and elementary childhood classrooms, implications across grade levels will be addressed. Participants will be able to empower and encourage students toward success by embedding mutual respect into all aspects of their instruction.

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Topics that will be covered:

  • What is Positive Discipline and why is it important?
  • Why are constructive guidance, encouragement, and affirmation so crucial?
  • What does Positive Discipline look like in practice?
  • How can participants use Positive Discipline for successful classroom management and in developing thriving curricula?

Learning Objectives and Outcomes

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify principle characteristics of a Positive Discipline environment. (Gagné’s Verbal and Intellectual Skills)
  • Describe examples and scenarios of Positive Discipline. (Gagné’s Verbal and Intellectual Skills)
  • Evaluate students’ needs by regulating, training, guiding, preparing, and instructing them through an equitable, kind-and-firm, communication-rich approach. (Gagné’s Intellectual Skills and Cognitive Strategies)
  • Model Positive Discipline and facilitate mutual respect in the classroom. (Gagné’s Intellectual Skills and Attitudes)
  • Design a curriculum that embodies principles of Positive Discipline, mutual respect, inquiry, and democracy. (Gagné’s Intellectual Skills, Cognitive Strategies, and Attitudes)

Course Units: Begin Here

Unit 1: Identify & Describe

What is Positive Discipline and why is it important?

Unit 2: Evaluate & Explore

What does Positive Discipline look like in practice? Why are constructive guidance, encouragement, and affirmation so crucial?

Unit 3: Model & Design

How can participants use Positive Discipline for successful classroom management and in developing thriving curricula?

References and Resources

  • Bielaczyc, K. & Collins, A. (1999). Learning communities in classrooms: A reconceptualization of educational practice. In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory (pp. 269-292). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Kellam, S. G., Mackenzie, A. C. L., Brown, Hendricks, C. B., Poduska, J., Wang, W., Petras, H. & Wilcox, H. (2011). The good behavior game and the future of prevention and treatment. Addiction Science and Clinical Practice, 6(1): 73-84.
  • Leary, M. R., Kowalski, R. M., Smith, L. & Phillips, S. (2003). Teasing, rejection, and violence: Case studies of the school shootings. Aggressive Behavior, 29: 202–214.
  • Montessori, M. (1995). The absorbent mind. (Unknown, Trans.). New York: Henry Holt & Company, Inc. (Original work published 1949)
  • Nelson, J. (2006). Positive discipline. New York: Ballantine Books. (Original work published 1981)
  • Platt, A. R. (1979). Efficacy of class meetings in elementary schools. Sacramento: California State University.
  • Rifkin, J. (2010). The empathic civilization. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/jeremy_rifkin_on_the_empathic_civilization
  • TeachingMinute. (4 May 2012). K5 case study: Positive reinforcements. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ml1tih5zSY
  • Zaki, J. (23 Dec 2010). What, me care? Young are less empathetic. Scientific American. Retrieved from http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-me-care/

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