Difference between revisions of "Modeling activity sheet"

From KNILT
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1. There are 8 presents on a table, and each present weighs the same amount. Combined, the presents weigh 24 pounds. How much does one present weigh? (Even if you can solve this without an algebraic phrase, use a variable to write an equation). <br/> <br/
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1. There are 8 presents on a table, and each present weighs the same amount. Combined, the presents weigh 24 pounds. How much does one present weigh? (Even if you can solve this without an algebraic phrase, use a variable to write an equation). <br/> <br/>
  
 
2. 3 of the presents on the table are replaced by 3 books. Now the total weight is 42 pounds. How much does each book weigh? <br/> <br/>
 
2. 3 of the presents on the table are replaced by 3 books. Now the total weight is 42 pounds. How much does each book weigh? <br/> <br/>
  
 
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Revision as of 19:57, 1 December 2011

The modeling activity sheet I used was adapted from a colleague's pre-algebra quiz about linear equations. Since she did not have a digital copy, I just made changes in class while going through the activity. On this page I have provided all of the questions, pictures, and solution methods.

REASONING WITH TWO-STEP EQUATIONS


Directions: Working with your partner, write equations using variables to describe the situations in each problem.

1. There are 8 presents on a table, and each present weighs the same amount. Combined, the presents weigh 24 pounds. How much does one present weigh? (Even if you can solve this without an algebraic phrase, use a variable to write an equation).

2. 3 of the presents on the table are replaced by 3 books. Now the total weight is 42 pounds. How much does each book weigh?

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