Difference between revisions of "Marshall Music PBL"

From KNILT
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== '''Performance-Based Objectives''' ==
 
== '''Performance-Based Objectives''' ==
  
Define course-level target objectives
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Learners will:
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*Identify project-based learning (Verbal and Intellectual)
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*Identify positive outcomes of project-based learning (Verbal and Intellectual)
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*Describe how project-based learning can positively impact the (music) classroom (Verbal and Intellectual)
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*Describe the process of creating and assessing project-based learning (Verbal and Intellectual)
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*Create authentic projects for the (music) classroom (Intellectual and Cognitive)
  
 
== '''Task Analysis''' ==
 
== '''Task Analysis''' ==

Revision as of 19:37, 30 September 2019



About Me

I am a certified K-12 music teacher who has taught every grade level and ensembles ranging from orchestra to band to advanced choir. I am currently in my 3rd year of teaching middle school general music and chorus. I work on improving my skills through writing curriculum and participating in the assessment team for the district.

My Topic and Purpose

The intent of this course is to show educators the positive results of using project-based learning in the music classroom as well as other classes, as well as walk educators through the process of designing and using authentic projects in the classroom.

Questions that will be covered:

  • What is project-based learning?
  • What are the benefits of using project-based learning?
  • What does project-based learning look like in the music classroom?
  • How can educators use project-based learning to create authentic, hands-on engagement and assessment?

Learning Outcomes

Learners will:

  • Identify project-based learning (Verbal and Intellectual)
  • Identify positive outcomes of project-based learning (Verbal and Intellectual)
  • Describe how project-based learning can positively impact the (music) classroom (Verbal and Intellectual)
  • Describe the process of creating and assessing project-based learning (Verbal and Intellectual)
  • Create authentic projects for the (music) classroom (Intellectual and Cognitive)


Needs Assessment

Instructional Problem

In today's society collaboration and authentic learning are highly praised. Many teachers struggle with finding ways to incorporate authentic learning in their classroom. Many teachers also struggle finding ways to promote effective collaboration between students. "At its core, project-based learning is based on the idea that real-life problems capture student interest, provoke critical thinking, and develop skills as they engage in and complete complex undertakings that typically result in a realistic product, event, or presentation to an audience"(Tobias, Campbell, & Greco, 2015). In order for teachers to incorporate successful project based learning in the classroom they need to truly understand what it is and do iterative work on creating authentic projects.

Since it is a teachers' goal to promote transfer outside their classroom, projects demonstrate how information learned in a classroom setting can then be transferred into real-life settings and applications. Project based learning is a type of learning that uses active questioning, inquiry, and peer learning to create an environment where everyone has a voice and teachers and students can collaborate together to find solutions to authentic problems. (Boss & Larmer,2018) In my experience project based learning improves engagement, promotes problem solving strategies, promotes collaboration, and provides real life skills to the learners.

What is to be learned

Educators will learn about the benefits of project based learning, and be guided through successfully incorporating project based learning into their classrooms. Educators will use what they know about their students and student interests to create authentic projects.

The learners

Learners can include anyone in the educational field, but more specifically music teachers. Learners should be looking to create more hands-on, authentic, project-based assessments. Instruction and activities will be focused on guiding teachers into creating projects that can be brought into a classroom.

Instructional Context

The instruction will take place online so the learner must have access to a computer and the internet in order for learning to take place. The course will provide readings, videos, and pictures, and lectures to help provide the information while also using skilled questioning and check and connects to promote learning.

Exploring the problem and solution

Participants will explore the benefits of project based learning in the classroom. Through information, activities, and expert guidance participants will be able to design authentic projects for their classrooms.

Goals

The main goal of this mini-course is to give educators the skills to incorporate project-based learning into their classroom. By the end of this course learners should have designed at least one authentic project to implement in their classrooms complete with scoring guides and rubrics to assess the students effectively.

Analysis of the Learner and Context

Performance-Based Objectives

Learners will:

  • Identify project-based learning (Verbal and Intellectual)
  • Identify positive outcomes of project-based learning (Verbal and Intellectual)
  • Describe how project-based learning can positively impact the (music) classroom (Verbal and Intellectual)
  • Describe the process of creating and assessing project-based learning (Verbal and Intellectual)
  • Create authentic projects for the (music) classroom (Intellectual and Cognitive)

Task Analysis

Elaborate and analyze the objectives to identify more specific enabling and supporting objectives.

Curriculum Map

Map out the sequence of learning units and activities to achieve the defined objectives.

References and Resources

Boss, S., & Larmer, J. (2018). Project based teaching: how to create rigorous and engaging learning experiences. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Tobias, E. S., Campbell, M. R., & Greco, P. (2015). Bringing Curriculum to Life. Music Educators Journal, 102(2), 39–47. doi: 10.1177/0027432115607602