Difference between revisions of "Lesson 3: High and Low Prep Strategies"

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Differentiation strategies can require varied amounts of preparation time.  High-prep strategies will often require a teacher to both create multiple pathways to process information and or demonstrate learning.
 
Differentiation strategies can require varied amounts of preparation time.  High-prep strategies will often require a teacher to both create multiple pathways to process information and or demonstrate learning.
  
Low-prep strategies might require a teacher to strategically create process and product choices for students.  they will then be given the chance to choose which option to pursue given their learning profile or readiness.
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Low-prep strategies might require a teacher to strategically create process and product choices for students.  They will then be given the chance to choose which option to pursue given their learning profile or readiness.
  
 
'''<u>Below is a list of various Low Prep Strategies</u>'''
 
'''<u>Below is a list of various Low Prep Strategies</u>'''
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'''<u>Below is a list of various High Prep Strategies</u>'''
 
'''<u>Below is a list of various High Prep Strategies</u>'''
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[[File:Screen Shot 2016-12-14 at 9.30.03 PM.png]]
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'''Here is a question for for thought.  How many of these strategies have you experienced as student?  What about in your classroom?'''
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'''Navigation links:'''
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[[Lesson 1: What is Differentiated Instruction?]]
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[[Lesson 2: Content, Process, and product]]
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[[Lesson 4:  Learning Menus]]
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[[Differentiated Instruction in the Social studies Classroom|Course Home]]
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==References==
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Doubet, K., & Hockett, J. (2015). Differentiation in Middle & High School - Strategies to Engage All Learners. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.
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Hall,T., Vue, G., Strangman, N., & Meyer, A. (2003). Differentiated instruction and implications for UDL implementation. Wakefield, MA: National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum. (Links updated 2014). Retrieved December 14, 2016, from http://aem.cast.org/about/publications/2003/ncac-differentiated-instruction-udl.html
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Says, J. (2016). Instructional Strategies. Retrieved December 14, 2016, from http://www.fortheteachers.org/instructional_strategies/

Latest revision as of 14:08, 3 November 2021

Differentiation strategies can require varied amounts of preparation time. High-prep strategies will often require a teacher to both create multiple pathways to process information and or demonstrate learning.

Low-prep strategies might require a teacher to strategically create process and product choices for students. They will then be given the chance to choose which option to pursue given their learning profile or readiness.

Below is a list of various Low Prep Strategies

Screen Shot 2016-12-14 at 9.20.28 PM.png


Below is a list of various High Prep Strategies

Screen Shot 2016-12-14 at 9.30.03 PM.png


Here is a question for for thought. How many of these strategies have you experienced as student? What about in your classroom?


Navigation links:

Lesson 1: What is Differentiated Instruction?

Lesson 2: Content, Process, and product

Lesson 4: Learning Menus

Course Home



References

Doubet, K., & Hockett, J. (2015). Differentiation in Middle & High School - Strategies to Engage All Learners. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Hall,T., Vue, G., Strangman, N., & Meyer, A. (2003). Differentiated instruction and implications for UDL implementation. Wakefield, MA: National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum. (Links updated 2014). Retrieved December 14, 2016, from http://aem.cast.org/about/publications/2003/ncac-differentiated-instruction-udl.html

Says, J. (2016). Instructional Strategies. Retrieved December 14, 2016, from http://www.fortheteachers.org/instructional_strategies/